6 Timely Tips for Using Apps with Kids

Do your kids or grandkids use apps on your phone, tablet or e-reader? Of course they do. Many apps are fun, educational and engaging. But before you hand over your mobile device to a youngster, here are six things to know and do:

  1. Try out the apps your kid wants to use so you’re comfortable with the content and the features.
  1. Use the device and app settings to restrict a kid’s ability to download apps, make purchases within an app or access additional material.
  1. Consider turning off your wi-fi and carrier connections using “airplane mode” to disable any interactive features, prevent inadvertent taps and block access to material that you think is inappropriate or just don’t want.
  1. Look for statements about whether the app or anything within the app collects kids’ personal information — and whether they limit sharing, using or retaining the information. If you can’t find those assurances, choose another app.
  1. Check on whether the app connects to social media, gaming platforms or other services that enable sharing photos, video or personal information, or chatting with other players. Then determine whether you can block or limit those connections.
  1. Talk to your kids about the restrictions you set for downloading, purchasing and using apps; tell them what information you’re comfortable sharing through mobile devices, and why. 

Want to know more? The FTC has released a new report on mobile apps for kids. Following up on a previous report, the survey found, among other things, that many apps included interactive features, or sent information from the mobile device to ad networks, analytics companies, or other third parties, without disclosing the practices to parents. 

Tagged with: app, cell phone, kids, mobile, privacy
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Privacy & Identity

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It's ridiculous and the lies just keep coming~~they broke into our Uverse box, cut all our lines, after combining an ATT cell account and a Uverse account that belonged to different people in our household, and there was another land line that had also belonged to the cell phone account holder that was still wired into our house, that someone was spoofing and running a Google ad, complete with photos, advertising apartments for rent, at our address!! Pretty cheeky, and their encryption service is scary if you ask me. Either that, or they've got rogue employees selling lists of customer data all over the country. Good grief. Absolute nightmare since we switched over to Uverse, should have slammed the door in that woman's face and told her to keep moving. Horror story from the word go. They hacked into our accounts, connected them, and broke into our Uverse box, leaving us without phone service, internet service, TV service etc. I had to call on the phone, wss bounced around for more than 3 hours. Initially I was told they would have someone out immediately, same day. When I finally got tech support, on a Wednesday~~they said I would have to wait until Monday???!! Really??? And this was after one of their lineman who had been working on the poles across the street had been wandering in and out of our back yard, where there is no Uverse equipment at all. He had messed with our fuse box and blown out $600 surge protector~~at least I didn't lose the gear attached to it. And in the past year I have paid more than $12,000 in IT bills. Freaking nightmare. Attorney general, local police don't seem to care, so I suppose maybe an attorney? Tried to file a complaint with FTC, but they don't seem to care either, who knows, I guess I have to put up with this or maybe live without a phone, not sure. I could maybe disconnect the landlines here but we've had them since 1970 so, not really sure I want to do that.

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