This is an A and B conversation so C your way to the privacy seminar

There’s so much to look forward to in the spring — warmer weather, cherry blossoms, March madness, spring break, and… privacy seminars. That’s right: nothing says spring quite like the FTC’s upcoming Spring Privacy Series. These two-hour seminars will explore new and emerging technologies and their impact on consumer privacy.

The first event — Mobile Device Tracking — will explore technologies that allow retail stores and others to track people’s movements through and around shops and other places via their mobile devices. Here are just some of the topics we’ll touch on:

  • What kinds of mobile device tracking are companies using now? What does the future look like?
  • Mobile device tracking vs. online tracking: Compare and contrast.
  • How anonymous is the tracking? What are the privacy and security risks? What choices do consumers have?
  • When designing and using technologies like this, how can companies implement the principles of privacy by design, simplified consumer choice, and increased transparency?

Join the discussion on February 19, 2014, from 10 am to noon at the FTC’s Conference Center at 601 New Jersey Avenue, N.W., in Washington, DC.

Next on the list: a seminar on Alternative Scoring Products. These days, data brokers offer scores that predict trends or consumer behavior. Businesses might use those predictive scores for fraud prevention, marketing, or advertising. Consumers have little or no access to the underlying data or information about how it’s used. But those scores can have a big impact on the offers people may get from a company or even whether they’ll be able to speak to higher-ranking customer service reps. The discussion will focus on issues like:

  • What kinds of predictive scores are on the market now, how are companies using them, and what’s in the pipeline?
  • How accurate are the scores and the underlying information?
  • What are the privacy implications?
  • What consumer protections should be provided; for example, should consumers have access to these scores and the underlying data used to create them?

Mark your calendars for March 19, 2014, from 10 am to noon, at the FTC’s Conference Center in DC.

The date and location of the third seminar is still TBA, but the topic — Consumer Generated and Controlled Health Data — is sure to get people thinking. Consumers are taking a more active role in researching health issues and using technology to monitor their conditions. For example, some people upload their health information into apps to manage and analyze data. Some of those apps go a step further and transmit that info to others. For sure, there are benefits when consumers take an active role, but what needs to be done to keep health-related data secure? The seminar will consider questions like:

  • What types of sites and services are out there and how are consumers using them?
  • What kind of privacy and security protections do consumers expect? Are companies living up to those expectations?
  • Do consumers differentiate between these businesses and traditional health care companies more likely to be covered by HIPAA?
  • What restrictions (if any) do ad networks and others impose on tracking of health data?

We’ll be sure to keep you updated on our Spring Privacy Series as the dates get closer so check the blog for updates or visit the FTC’s Events Calendar.

Blog Topics: 
Privacy & Identity

Comments

Is there a webinar for this presentation? if so, can you share link?

The FTC provides a live webcast for nearly all workshops and events. The link to the webcast will be add to the event's webpage the day of the event.

Thanks this will be very helpful

If we cannot attend in person, can we attend online?

The FTC provides a live webcast for nearly all workshops and events. The link to the webcast will be add to the event's webpage the day of the event.

Its clear that this was done,in the dark and if not for the revelation's of Mr. Snowden,how far would these type of things gone unnoticed,however,even before the internet,particular behavior's,and pattern's were still being played out,why would it be any different because of it,the same crime's are still committed,and its,not because of the internet,it has only allowed more people to see how sick a world we have lived in,focusing on issue's that do not allow for the freedom's and liberty's and justice,that was fought for,this will be a very sad era in American history,not just for the American people but for many who found just these very thing was something that made the past just a little easier to bare. If suggestion were needed it would be to restore back to the people what is rightfully theirs personally. Its time for a role call.

Leave a Comment

Commenting Policy

Read Our Privacy Act Statement

It is your choice whether to submit a comment. If you do, you must create a user name, or we will not post your comment. The Federal Trade Commission Act authorizes this information collection for purposes of managing online comments. Comments and user names are part of the Federal Trade Commission’s (FTC) public records system, and user names also are part of the FTC’s computer user records system. We may routinely use these records as described in the FTC’s Privacy Act system notices. For more information on how the FTC handles information that we collect, please read our privacy policy.