Cosmetics company crosses the line(s)

Check out ads for some skincare products and you might have to flip back to the cover to see if you’re reading a beauty magazine or a science text. A company may use technical terms and say its claims are “clinically proven,” but the Federal Trade Commission is concerned that’s not always the case. 

Ads for L’Oréal’s Lancôme Génifique line — which sold for as much as $132 — said the products would “boost genes’ activity,” resulting in “visibly younger skin in just 7 days.” Ads for L’Oréal Paris Youth Code made similar claims about the “new era of skincare: gene science” and that consumers could “crack the code to younger acting skin.”

Businesses must have competent and reliable scientific evidence for claims like this. According to the FTC, L’Oréal’s claims overstated the science. A proposed consent order settles charges that L’Oréal’s gene science claims for Génifique and Youth Code were false or unsubstantiated.

If you’re looking to regain some of your youthful glow, the FTC suggests applying a healthy measure of skepticism when evaluating scientific-sounding claims for cosmetics — or any other product.

 

Blog Topics: 
Health & Fitness

Comments

I do apologize, I'm a first time user. I signed up to receive regular reports from you because I do get things in the mail that might be scams and I just like to know about things ahead of time. So needless to say I am Not Responding to the current letter that is in front of me but I have a major question about something else. I will point out before I asked that question that if this is not the place to ask questions then let me know where I can ask my question in future mailings. My question is about Preston Lord enterprises. Their telephone number is 1 800 4667 419 what they're supposed to be all about, is you pay them $99, refundable deposit, with $5 for priority shipping, all for receiving books that you can staple and mail out. He pays us money prior to mailing these books out in accordance to the number of books that he wants you to mail out after you have Stapled them. I did come across a site online that indicated that they were a scam. Also I was advised by that site to contact you for the response as to whether they are a scam or not. So needless to say you will be my last decision. Whatever you say goes.

We’ve written in this blog before about work-at-home businesses that have turned out to the scams. See blogs A “work at home” scheme that didn’t work and A work at home opportunity that it’s not so golden for more information. You can also refer to the article Work at Home Businesses. If you have a complaint about a company you did business with, you can report it online or by calling 1-877-FTC-HELP.

What about Algenist and their claim that algae has "demonstrated significant anti-aging properties"?

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