Health & Fitness

Taken for a glide

Would you be willing to exercise 3 minutes a day to get fit? It’s a compelling proposition. Unfortunately, in the case of the ab GLIDER, lost pounds, body inches, or clothing sizes weren’t just an easy glide away.

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Health & Fitness

These health care plans were scams

Before you sign up and pay any money for health insurance or discount plans, check out all the available options — and any claims they make about coverage. Some people who call you up promoting a way for you to save could be pitching a scam.

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Health & Fitness

These weight loss pills won’t make you “High School Skinny”

Many companies have tag lines designed to catch your attention; many are true and backed up by good, solid evidence. Others… not so much. They may be downright deceptive.

Have you heard this one? “Get High School Skinny!” That’s what marketers of Healthe Trim promised people who bought their line of weight loss supplements. However, according to a settlement announced by the FTC, the company had no scientific evidence that these products actually worked.

Image of Healthe Trim product bottle
 

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Health & Fitness

Wow! Your baby can read? Really?

All parents think their babies rock. But when a company says its product will help a kid master reading Harry Potter during the potty-training years, it needs solid science to support those claims.

The FTC says Dr. Robert Titzer and his company, Infant Learning, Inc., deceived consumers with ads for Your Baby Can Read, a set of DVDs, books and word cards that cost around $200. These ads and other promotional materials promoted the program’s ability to teach babies as young as nine months to read — with their skills advancing to books like Charlotte’s Web by ages three or four.

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Health & Fitness

Concussion claims

Concussions and their long-term effects on the brain are a hot topic — for good reason. If you play sports, a claim that a product could protect you from a concussion would be mighty compelling. And you’d expect it would be a claim you could trust, right?

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Health & Fitness

Weight loss double-talk

Many people would give just about anything to eat like a Sumo wrestler, yet have the body of a tennis pro. And, unfortunately, many people have — given their money, that is — for pills and products falsely promising significant weight loss with little or no effort.

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Health & Fitness

A juice with prickly claims

A wellness drink derived from the “prickly pear” cactus fruit that does wonders for your skin, relieves inflammation, improves breathing, and reduces swelling of your joints and muscles? If only there were scientific studies to back up those claims for this tasty concoction, called Nopalea.

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Health & Fitness

Visit the FTC at the NCLR Annual Conference in Los Angeles

The FTC is going to sunny California!

If you are near Los Angeles July 19 – 22, visit the FTC booth at the National Council of La Raza (NCLR) annual conference! I’ll be there, with other bilingual staffers, to answer your questions relating to frauds and scams, as well as how to file a complaint.

Cosmetics company crosses the line(s)

Check out ads for some skincare products and you might have to flip back to the cover to see if you’re reading a beauty magazine or a science text. A company may use technical terms and say its claims are “clinically proven,” but the Federal Trade Commission is concerned that’s not always the case.

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Health & Fitness

The latest scam targeting Spanish-speaking consumers

You know those commercials you see on national TV selling everything from clothing to electronics, even weight-loss products? It’s tempting to call the number on the screen, many of us do. When you place an order, you trust that the company you call will send quality products. But the latest scam targeting Spanish-speaking consumers shows that isn’t always what happens.

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