Health & Fitness

A juice with prickly claims

A wellness drink derived from the “prickly pear” cactus fruit that does wonders for your skin, relieves inflammation, improves breathing, and reduces swelling of your joints and muscles? If only there were scientific studies to back up those claims for this tasty concoction, called Nopalea.

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Health & Fitness

Visit the FTC at the NCLR Annual Conference in Los Angeles

The FTC is going to sunny California!

If you are near Los Angeles July 19 – 22, visit the FTC booth at the National Council of La Raza (NCLR) annual conference! I’ll be there, with other bilingual staffers, to answer your questions relating to frauds and scams, as well as how to file a complaint.

Cosmetics company crosses the line(s)

Check out ads for some skincare products and you might have to flip back to the cover to see if you’re reading a beauty magazine or a science text. A company may use technical terms and say its claims are “clinically proven,” but the Federal Trade Commission is concerned that’s not always the case.

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Health & Fitness

The latest scam targeting Spanish-speaking consumers

You know those commercials you see on national TV selling everything from clothing to electronics, even weight-loss products? It’s tempting to call the number on the screen, many of us do. When you place an order, you trust that the company you call will send quality products. But the latest scam targeting Spanish-speaking consumers shows that isn’t always what happens.

Weight loss: Fact vs. Fiction

Thinking about squeezing into that itsy bitsy teeny weeny yellow polka dot bikini — or baring your bod in that form-fitting suit? It’s beach season, and those quick weight loss products might seem appealing. You’ve probably seen the ads for pills, powders, patches, belts, and creams promising to melt the pounds away without any diet or exercise. But do those products really work?

Learn how to tell fact from fiction when it comes to weight loss products. Play the FTC’s new Weight Loss Challenge game, and have fun getting the skinny on safe and effective weight loss!

Weight loss challenge game

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Health & Fitness

What’s in a health claim? Should be a healthy dose of proof

Name a common health concern, and there’s probably a dietary supplement that promises a solution. But when advertised promises aren’t backed up with adequate proof, the Federal Trade Commission sees a problem. The makers of the BrainStrong Adult dietary supplement agreed to settle FTC charges of deceptive advertising for making unsupported health claims about BrainStrong with DHA, an omega-3 fatty acid.

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Health & Fitness

Another louse-y product not living up to its claim

It’s not often I get to write a blog post that causes phantom head scratching. Before I tell you why, fair warning: If you have kids, or simply like to huddle with friends for the latest and greatest selfie, consider this a cootie alert for: deceptive head lice repellent!

Tell us about it

Job scams. Affinity fraud. Bogus – and dangerous – dietary supplements. Notario fraud. Government imposter scams. These are just a few of the issues facing consumers in California’s immigrant community – and they’re the same issues the FTC is seeing nationwide. We knew from our last Fraud Survey that many consumer scams impact Latinos and African-Americans disproportionately. What our data did not tell us is how immigrants fare, so we went straight to the source to try learn about the marketplace in immigrant communities.

Checking up on consumer generated health information

Whether it’s a website where people diagnosed with the same medical condition can share their stories or an app to find out how long it will take in the gym to burn off a Macadamia Mania Ripple sundae, consumers are taking their health in their own hands — and generating a massive amount of digital data in the process.

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New report highlights alcohol industry efforts to reduce advertising and marketing to teens

Did you know that alcohol companies have voluntary guidelines for where they place ads? 

For example, alcohol companies agree that they will advertise on television programs and websites where at least 70% of the audience is comprised of people 21 and older, based on reliable data.

But do they really keep their promises?

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Health & Fitness

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