A juice with prickly claims

A wellness drink derived from the “prickly pear” cactus fruit that does wonders for your skin, relieves inflammation, improves breathing, and reduces swelling of your joints and muscles? If only there were scientific studies to back up those claims for this tasty concoction, called Nopalea.

In nationally-aired infomercials, as well as radio, print and web ads, a dietary supplement company called TriVita, Inc., marketed Nopalea, claiming that it is a natural and nutritious juice that has been scientifically proven to reduce a list of maladies, including pain relief. The FTC alleged that TriVita didn’t have the science to back up the claims they were making about the juice’s health benefits, and now has announced a settlement with the company.

Nopalea wasn’t cheap, either. Consumers were expected to pay up to $39.99 per 32 ounce bottle of the juice, plus shipping and handling.

Before you buy, eat or drink any dietary supplement, check it out with your health care professional. Be sure that any health supplements or wellness drinks you ingest don’t cause serious interactions with any medicines you may be taking. And to learn how to decode ads for health and fitness products that make promises about their benefits, check out the information in our Health & Fitness section.

Tagged with: diet, health
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Health & Fitness


There are other companies touting this cactus out there. You got to back it up with real scientific studies and research. I am surprised they Julian and I

I've noticed these type of advertisements! Those advertisement usually have a person who saes he or she is a doctor and has done medical research using some type of weed or animal from clean or far away part of ocean.But I notice these type of advertisements are usually shown at late nite or on regular T.V.!!!! People wanting to ' make money ' will say 'anything' to get your money !!! And the fact that media station are making money showing and running these type of advertisements are making 'money'!!!

via vient'e makes the same claims and then some.

I just received my consumer refund check from the FTC consumer protection case against TriVita. It is a total of .78¢. That is for a $39.99 bottle of Cactus Juice that they made fraudulent claims as to ĥaving miraculous health claims. Yeah, FTC....I feel so justified! NOT!!!

The FTC mailed almost 500,000 checks totaling approximately $3 million to consumers who lost money to the diet supplement marketer. Read about miracle health claims you should avoid to protect your health and money.

My wife has three cases of Nopalea purchased in 2012. Unopened.She became ill at the time with a kidney absess.Doctors could not tell how this absess came about.I sent Mr. Ellison a letter asking to return this product.Waiting to hear from him.

Just received my $ 19.18 refund check. Thank you FTC for regulating one company's claims. It must be a HUGE job to investigate so MANY different companies with so many different health-improvement claims. Money well spent.

Also just got 78 cents. How much did the lawyers get?

The marketers agreed to provide $3.5 million for consumer refunds in order to settle FTC charges that they deceived consumers with unsupported claims that their drink, Nopalea, would treat a variety of health problems. The FTC attorneys who worked on the case are federal employees.

If the product didn't work for an individual, why not just return it for a refund? Products may work for some, but. not for all. What kind of proof would be needed? Were all of the customers who were purchasing Nopalea asked to provide an opinion or testimonial?

In this case, the FTC alleged that TriVita didn’t have the science to back up the claims it was making about the juice’s health benefits. The FTC reached a settlement with the company.

I received a FREE bottle from TriVita as the company gave me a coupon. I did try it and was pleasantly surprised as it DID work for me in the month that I took it and it was a nice drink. The cost was too high for me though. Have already shredded your 78 cent check against this poor company.

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