Librarians, Check It Out! FTC’s at the ALA Annual Conference

If you’re headed to Chicago for the American Library Association’s Annual Conference, swing by to say hello. FTC staff will be at Booth # 934, ready to hand out our materials – all free, all the time – and talk about how to use them in your community. If you want a little more detail, come to my poster session, Saturday June 29, from 2:30pm to 4 pm. I’ll be talking about our innovative collaboration with the Center for Applied Linguistics to create materials for people who have consumer questions and want basic information. These resources are helpful for everyone who wants to cut to the chase, especially those of us who are crunched for time. As a bonus, these resources are particularly useful for people with challenges reading English. The direct, easy-to-use style presents information in a few ways: on a website; on one-page tip sheets, in videos and through audio read-alongs. They’ll help you give your community what they need to know and do on some key consumer topics, like managing money, dealing with credit and debt, and avoiding identity theft.

Do your patrons have a variety of backgrounds, cultures, literacy levels, and learning styles? These resources may be a perfect addition to your programs. Look for the Consumer.gov poster at Table 15. I’m looking forward to sharing our tips and tools – and hearing from you!

Tagged with: credit, debt, identity theft

Comments

Will it be online?

Can you tell me the distinction between the information at consumer.gov and consumer.ftc.gov. I'm trying to write a description of how people can find consumer protection information and if someone is looking for info by topic, which one should they use?

The answer depends on your audience. Consumer.gov was designed to be easy to read. We’ve kept it to the basics about consumer protection, plain and simple. Much of the same information is at consumer.ftc.gov, just with a little more detail.  Consumer.ftc.gov covers a broader range of topics, as well.

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