Military Consumer Protection Day 2013

Calling all military families and veterans! Are you looking to protect yourself or your family from fraud, identity theft, and scams? Maybe you’re curious about the best way to use credit, shop for a used car, or maximize your security online. 

Military folks are consumers, too – and critical to the economy. Just ask the 1.4 million men and women on active duty or the 1.1 million in the National Guard and Reserve forces. But the unique challenges of military life – frequent relocation, separation from family and friends, and the stresses of deployment – can make military households an attractive target for scam artists. In fact, during 2012 the Federal Trade Commission logged more than 62,000 complaints from servicemembers, veterans, and spouses about their experiences in the marketplace.

That led the FTC and its partners to sponsor Military Consumer Protection Day on July 17, 2013. It’s a great day to empower military and veteran communities with information as the first line of defense against consumer fraud. Take a look at Military.ncpw.gov for free tips and tools from the FTC, Department of Defense, Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, Military Saves and more than a dozen other federal and state agencies, consumer advocates and military support groups. These organizations have joined forces to distribute resources to help you avoid scams, invest wisely, manage money and credit, and deal with debt. The outreach toolkit has tips so you can help spread the word. Distribute free materials or host an event on July 17 – or any time throughout the year. Visit Military.ncpw.gov to download a sample press release, newsletter article, event flyer, social media posts, and ideas for sharing a Humvee full of practical, no-nonsense resources with your friends, family, retirees, veterans, and colleagues in the military.

Comments

I COME FROM A MILITARY HISTORY OF MY FAMILY IM A VICTIM OF CYBER. STALKING I HAVE MADE TWO POLICE REPORTS. AND MY USER NAMES PASSWORDS KEEP BEING CHANGED I HAD THE DEBT CARD DIRECT EXPRESS THAT KEPT HAVING ELECTRONIC TRANSFERS THAT I DID NOT AUTHORIZE.

Call the bank who issued the debit card and tell them about the unauthorized charges. Ask the bank to credit your account. You also might want to check your computer for malware, and change the login name and password for any accounts that have been tampered with -- from a different computer if possible. Be sure to choose passwords that would be difficult for someone else to guess.

I recently (19 Feb 2014) purchased a trailer from HuskyCargo.com, the trailer was misrepresented and I was not provided what I was promised. I was then told by the owner that I was a "liar" and that he would not speak to me concerning the problem. He refuses to honor the new trailer warranty as well. He went as far as to insult me and call me names. When I informed him that I was an active duty service member he told me that, "that doesn't hold weight with me." He told me never to contact him again, and restated that I was a liar. He then began to threaten me with "attorneys". I've never actually spoken to this person, all of this was through text messages. He would not call, or return calls. He would only text me. I spent almost $13,000 of my own hard earned money, only to have him insult me. He is now harassing me via text message. Is there someone I can contact? I contacted the BBB, but I am not sure who else I can contact.

If this was a used car and you have a problem that you think is covered by a warranty or service contract you have some options. This article gives you more information. You can always file a complaint with the FTC at www.ftc.gov/complaint

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