Money & Credit

L.A. lessons

Earlier this week, more than 80 people came together in Los Angeles. Federal, state, and local government agencies were there, along with legal services organizations, the State Bar, and non-profit groups. Our goal? To figure out how we can work together to protect immigrant consumers.

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Money & Credit

Sending money out of love, or sending a scammer money?

Love is a powerful thing. So when a loved one calls or emails, saying they’re in trouble, you’d want to help, right? If they ask you to send cash immediately — should you follow your heart?

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Money & Credit

Claims send bag makers to FTC’s doghouse

Being a dog owner isn't just about walks in the park. Your furry pal needs supplies too, like nutritious food, safe squeaky toys and waste bags for cleanup. Chances are, you rely on ads and product labels when you shop, so it’s important they tell the real story. The FTC sets standards for truth in advertising, and holds companies accountable for the claims they make to ensure you get sound information. The FTC recently sent letters warning 20 marketers of dog waste bags that their green claims about the bags may be deceptive.

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Money & Credit

The FTC’s new Hall of Shame — Banned Debt Collectors

There’s the “A List,” and then there’s the “D List.” I know which one I don’t want to be on. Now the FTC has its own version of the “D” List — its list of banned debt collectors.

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Money & Credit

Funeral providers must give price information

Planning a funeral can be challenging, but accurate information can help you sort through your options. Under the FTC’s Funeral Rule, providers have to give you information about the funeral goods and services they offer. But, according to the FTC, the Bradford-Connelly & Glickler Funeral Home didn’t give shoppers that timely information.

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Money & Credit

What’s the true cost of a car title loan?

Have you seen a sign offering a car title loan — also known as a pink-slip loan, title pledge or title pawn? These loans use your paid-off car as collateral, and you get a small, short-term loan with a high interest rate. You usually have to repay the loan in 15 or 30 days, and the annual percentage rate (APR) is often more than 100%. If you don’t pay back the loan, the company can repossess your car — and then you’re worse off than you were before. It’s a very expensive way to get money.

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Money & Credit

Fast-talk from Straight Talk and others about unlimited data

Unlimited talk, text, and data for $45 per month with no contract? That sounds like a great deal, but according to a recent FTC lawsuit, millions of people who bought  unlimited mobile plans from Straight Talk, Net10 Wireless, Simple Mobile, and Telcel America didn’t get what they paid for. And now they may be eligible for refunds.

Straight Talk Ad

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Money & Credit

Today’s news, tomorrow’s scam

When the headlines change, scammers follow: Natural disaster? Charity scams will follow. Medicare open season? Health care scams will follow. So we know from experience that, when immigration is in the headlines, scams will follow.

Here are some things to keep in mind if you’re in the immigration process – or would like to be – regardless of what’s in the news.

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Money & Credit

Get ready for National Consumer Protection Week!

It’s about that time again. Are you ready?

Every year, National Consumer Protection Week (NCPW), encourages people and businesses to learn more about avoiding scams and understanding consumer rights. This year, NCPW takes place March 1-7, 2015. NCPW highlights free resources from government agencies and consumer organizations to help people make smarter buying decisions and spot rip-offs.

FTC racks up charges against unscrupulous debt collector

If you’re behind in paying your bills, you may be contacted by a debt collector, but that doesn’t mean a collector can treat you unfairly. Under federal law, debt collectors — including collection agencies, lawyers who collect debts on a regular basis, and companies that buy delinquent debts and then try to collect them — can’t use abusive, deceptive or unfair practices to collect from you. But not all debt collectors play by the rules.

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Money & Credit

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