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Let’s celebrate Women’s History Month

March is Women’s History Month. At the FTC, we celebrate and honor the many female leaders whose work has significantly impacted the agency’s mission.

Let’s celebrate Women’s History Month

March is Women’s History Month. At the FTC, we celebrate and honor the many female leaders whose work has significantly impacted the agency’s mission.

Let’s celebrate Women’s History Month

March is Women’s History Month. At the FTC, we celebrate and honor the many female leaders whose work has significantly impacted the agency’s mission.

Let’s celebrate Women’s History Month

March is Women’s History Month. At the FTC, we celebrate and honor the many female leaders whose work has significantly impacted the agency’s mission.

Let’s celebrate Women’s History Month

March is Women’s History Month. At the FTC, we celebrate and honor the many female leaders whose work has significantly impacted the agency’s mission.

Let’s celebrate Women’s History Month

March is Women’s History Month. At the FTC, we celebrate and honor the many female leaders whose work has significantly impacted the agency’s mission.

What’s a predictive score?

Most consumers know that creditors use information about them and their credit experiences – like the number and type of accounts they have, their bill paying history, and whether they pay their bills on time – to create a credit score, which helps predict how credit worthy they are. (And if they don’t, they can learn about credit scores at the FTC’s Consumer Center.) What most consumers don’t know is that data brokers offer companies scores for other purposes unrelated to credit – for example, for marketing, advertising, identity verification, and fraud prevention. Businesses use these scores to decide which transactions require further scrutiny, what offers and prices to offer certain consumers, and even in what order to answer a consumer’s customer service call.

Spring Privacy Series logo

What’s a predictive score?

Most consumers know that creditors use information about them and their credit experiences – like the number and type of accounts they have, their bill paying history, and whether they pay their bills on time – to create a credit score, which helps predict how credit worthy they are. (And if they don’t, they can learn about credit scores at the FTC’s Consumer Center.) What most consumers don’t know is that data brokers offer companies scores for other purposes unrelated to credit – for example, for marketing, advertising, identity verification, and fraud prevention. Businesses use these scores to decide which transactions require further scrutiny, what offers and prices to offer certain consumers, and even in what order to answer a consumer’s customer service call.

Spring Privacy Series logo

What’s a predictive score?

Most consumers know that creditors use information about them and their credit experiences – like the number and type of accounts they have, their bill paying history, and whether they pay their bills on time – to create a credit score, which helps predict how credit worthy they are. (And if they don’t, they can learn about credit scores at the FTC’s Consumer Center.) What most consumers don’t know is that data brokers offer companies scores for other purposes unrelated to credit – for example, for marketing, advertising, identity verification, and fraud prevention. Businesses use these scores to decide which transactions require further scrutiny, what offers and prices to offer certain consumers, and even in what order to answer a consumer’s customer service call.

Spring Privacy Series logo

What’s a predictive score?

Most consumers know that creditors use information about them and their credit experiences – like the number and type of accounts they have, their bill paying history, and whether they pay their bills on time – to create a credit score, which helps predict how credit worthy they are. (And if they don’t, they can learn about credit scores at the FTC’s Consumer Center.) What most consumers don’t know is that data brokers offer companies scores for other purposes unrelated to credit – for example, for marketing, advertising, identity verification, and fraud prevention. Businesses use these scores to decide which transactions require further scrutiny, what offers and prices to offer certain consumers, and even in what order to answer a consumer’s customer service call.

Spring Privacy Series logo

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