When Home Insulation Claims Are Full of Hot Air

The FTC has announced that the owner of Energy Conservation Specialists (aka Thermalcool), a home insulation business, will pay up for telling people they could save 40 to 60% on their energy bills with his products — a claim he couldn’t prove — and for exaggerating the insulating power of his products.   

The truth is that no company can guarantee big energy savings for everyone. When it comes to products like insulation and windows, factors including the climate you live in, how your home is built, and the kind of heating and cooling system you use affect how much energy you’ll save.

One good way to get the most for your insulation dollar and accurate, honest information about a product’s insulating power: Before you make your purchase, read the FTC’s Home Insulation: It’s All About the R-Value. While you’re at it, check out the FTC’s other articles on saving energy at home.

Another great resource is the Department of Energy’s energysavers.gov, where you can learn more about different types of insulation and how they work.

Tagged with: energy, home improvement
Blog Topics: 
Homes & Mortgages

Comments

I agreed with you and also thank you for the shared post. The way we use energy is completely depends on the climate. We can save energy by changing our habits and by making some changes to the house which help us in the process of energy conservation. Insulation is one of those techniques.Different types of insulation includes DIY insulation which is widely used.

I bought a home from an individual that was built in 2005-2006. The individual said in the home's sale ad that it had R38 insulation in the walls, and R60 in the ceiling. I have since gotten plans for the home and the plans show R13 in the walls, and R38 in the ceiling. Does the FTC R-Value rule in anyway apply here? Will he not be able to deny knowing the true R values since the builder was required by law to tell him?

I forgot to mention the sale ad also stated "fully heated and insulated floors." After removing a section of the slab it was determined there is no insulation at all.

The points you make in this content are very clear, interesting and informative. I agree with several points here. Please continue these articles as they are very engaging. Great job!

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