Consumer Information Blog

Saving gas money on your spring break road trip

Hitting the highway on a road trip this spring? If you’re traveling on a budget, here are a few tips to help you save gas money.

Image of car at gas station

Blog Topics: 
Money & Credit

FTC to used car dealers: Play by the rules or pay the price

The FTC’s Used Car Rule has been the law of the land since 1985. It requires used car dealers to post a Buyers Guide on cars they offer for sale. The Guide gives customers important warranty and other information to help them make an informed buying decision.

So when Abernathy Motor Company failed to display a single Buyers Guide on all of the used cars for sale at its Jonesboro, Arkansas location — even after the FTC warned the company about the violation — the agency said it’s time to pay the piper.

Blog Topics: 
Money & Credit

A lotto malarkey

At the FTC, we’ve been warning people away from foreign lottery scams for years. So when one of our colleagues recently got an official-looking mailer from Canada, titled “RE: PRIZE WINNING NOTIFICATION,” we turned to our own advice to check it out.

Blog Topics: 
Money & Credit

Fake feds get people to pay

Have you ever gotten one of these calls? Someone says they’re with a government agency or the sheriff’s office and threatens that you’ll be sued or arrested if you don’t pay a supposed debt.

But really, the people contacting you are imposters looking to scare you into sending them money.

Blog Topics: 
Money & Credit

A ‘versatile’ way to get around the Do Not Call list

Some companies can be very sneaky these days. Especially when they buy lists of consumers’ phone numbers from companies that falsely claim those consumers have given written consent to get sales calls despite being on the National Do Not Call registry.

Blog Topics: 
Privacy & Identity

Let’s celebrate Women’s History Month

March is Women’s History Month. At the FTC, we celebrate and honor the many female leaders whose work has significantly impacted the agency’s mission.

What’s a predictive score?

Most consumers know that creditors use information about them and their credit experiences – like the number and type of accounts they have, their bill paying history, and whether they pay their bills on time – to create a credit score, which helps predict how credit worthy they are. (And if they don’t, they can learn about credit scores at the FTC’s Consumer Center.) What most consumers don’t know is that data brokers offer companies scores for other purposes unrelated to credit – for example, for marketing, advertising, identity verification, and fraud prevention. Businesses use these scores to decide which transactions require further scrutiny, what offers and prices to offer certain consumers, and even in what order to answer a consumer’s customer service call.

Spring Privacy Series logo

Check, please? Background check, that is.

So, you’re about to begin a new job search, and you’re ticking items off your to-do list.

  • You’ve set up an online account so you’ll know about new job openings.
  • You’ve polished your resume — and your shoes.
  • You’ve run through some possible interview questions with a friend.

Have you requested your annual credit report from www.annualcreditreport.com?

two people shaking hands over a desk

Blog Topics: 
Jobs & Making Money

From Las Vegas to the world

Earlier this week, law enforcement, legal services attorneys, consumer advocates and nearly 120 other people found common ground in Las Vegas. The Federal Trade Commission put together “Protecting Nevada’s Consumers: A Common Ground Conference” to discuss the consumer protection issues facing Nevadans. What did we learn? That Nevadans face some unique challenges – but many more are the same kinds of challenges we see across the region and country.

Can you believe that review?

Ever hear an expert review on a news segment or talk show? The experts might recommend a number of products, and hey, they’ve tried out the products themselves — and they’re experts appearing on reputable programs — so they must know what they’re talking about, right? Since they’re portrayed as independent reviewers, you may be more likely to believe what they say.

What if we told you these experts aren’t always as impartial as they seem, and what you’re hearing might be a sales pitch?

Photo of woman watching TV

Blog Topics: 
Money & Credit

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