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Another chapter in free grant fiction

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money in the shape of a present with a bowFree grants for regular people? The chance at some string-free money might seem like a godsend. But promises of free grants are just another scam to get your money.

That was the case with Cash Grant Institute, the FTC says. In fact, the man behind the scam — Paul Navestad — was ordered to pay more than $20 million. But he didn’t. So today the FTC announced that a federal judge has ordered Navestad to be jailed until he pays up. 

Here’s the backstory: Cash Grant Institute told people they’d already qualified for grants — up to $25,000 — that were readily available from federal, state, and local governments, private foundations, and wealthy individuals. But the grants didn’t exist, the FTC says. Instead, people were sent to sites that charged them for general information about getting grants. Even after paying, very few people qualified for any kind of grant, and those that did found it was a long, difficult process.

If that wasn’t enough, Cash Grant Institute also was a massive robocalling scheme, making more than 8 million robocalls — almost a third of them to numbers on the Do Not Call Registry.

In addition to the importance of filing a complaint about illegal robocalls, here’s what you need to know:

  • Don’t give out your bank account information to anyone you don’t know
  • Don’t pay any money for a “free” government grant
  • Know that scammers can fake phone numbers to look like they’re calling from Washington, D.C.

A real government agency won’t ask you to pay a processing fee for a grant you’ve already been awarded, or to pay for a list of grant-making institutions. The names of agencies and foundations that award grants are available for free at any public library or on the Internet. The only official access point for all federal grant-making agencies is grants.gov.

If you think you've been a victim of a grant scam, file a complaint with the FTC at ftc.gov/complaint. You also can report it to your state Attorney General. Read Government Grant Scams for more.

Tagged with: free, government, robocall, scam
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So I got 4 phone calls today say I got a loan but i have to send them $140 first for insurance is that sound right or should you have to pay money to get money if anybody can please let me know thank you the phone calls were made today proxim about 3 from 12 to 3 this afternoon

Today I received a call (robocall)from this number (518) 620-3678. Supposedly I was randomly chosen to receive a Federal Grant of $9000..but I needed to purchase a Federal Grant card for the deposit to be sent to Walmart after I receive the card..mind you the card cost $200..the agents name is supposed to be Tracy Moore ext. 107...DON'T DO IT...DID MY HOMEWORK..ITS A SCHEME AND A SCAM..REALLY COULDVE USED RHW MONEY BUT NOT FOR A FREE GRANT...$200 THATS NOT FREE...GO FIGURE

Well a few months back I had got these same phone calls all offering the same thing. I didn't fall for it but it was mighty tempting. So today 8-06-19, I got the same call again but the difference in the call was the amount. The first call was regarding a $9,000 free grant, this new call was for only $7,000. So once I told them that they hung up on me... A few hours after they called me back and offered me $9,000 and whatever amount I could come up with for the card I was told to buy at Walmart Western Union or MoneyGram. The numbers they called me from are253-470-6880 sharon104 and 323-813-1979 Anita smith0416 there was a third number as well and when I called it back it was a Google voice number. Also during these phone calls they were pinging my location and recording everything. So it is a scam it's not real.... But it sounds so convincing.

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