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The Federal Trade Commission works closely with legal services providers and consumer advocates to root out frauds affecting communities across the nation. Several of our partners have told us about an income scam that’s targeting Latino organizations -- even churches. Here’s how it works:

You get a call. The scammer says he’s with a well-known airline and wants to hire people who speak Spanish to collect boarding passes, work at the ticket counter, or handle luggage. He says the jobs pay $18 an hour. To sweeten the deal, he promises to pay you $150 for every person you refer to him, and that people can use an Individual Tax Identification Number if that’s what they have.

Then, when the people contact him, he tells them to wire money – sometimes as much as $300 – to pay for a background check or uniforms. So people wire the money, but – you guessed it, there is no job. The whole story is a lie.  And the people who wired the money? They’re out $300.  

Scam artists are in business to cheat people. Here’s how to avoid some of the tricks they use:  

  • When you get a call from someone offering you a job, contact the company yourself to see if they’re really hiring -- even if you know and trust the person who calls you.
  • Never wire money to someone you don’t know, no matter how compelling the reason.  
  • Don’t believe anyone who promises you a job. They’re lying. No one can promise you a job.

If someone you know was tricked into wiring money for a job that didn’t exist, report it to the money transfer company:

  • MoneyGram: 1-800-666-3947 (1-800-955-7777 for Spanish) or at moneygram.com
  • Western Union: 1-800-448-1492

Then, report it to the FTC at ftc.gov/complaint or at 1-877-FTC-HELP. Give as much or as little information as you are comfortable with. Any information helps investigators build cases against scammers.

To learn more about spotting an income scam, watch this video or visit ftc.gov/jobscams.

Tagged with: income, job search, jobs, scam
Blog Topics: 
Jobs & Making Money

Comments

Perhaps, when items of this nature happen, and they are specific to a community (i.e. in this case the Latino community), try putting it out in Spanish as well. Thank you.

....Never mind...Just found the Spanish translation...forwarded the notice to those who may be affected. Thank you.

You should always read everything very carefully.

I AM A LITTLE BIT CONFUSSED, WHERE IS THE JOB IN SPANISH? IS ONLINE OR IN PERSON?

This blog is alerting consumers about job offers that are a scam, not real. The scammer offers you a job, but says you have to pay to get it. If you receive a call from someone who says they have a job offer for you but you have to wire them money first to get the job, that’s a sure sign of a scam. This blog gives you tips to avoid the tricks scammers use. 

can I email this to someone else from your site?

Yes, please. Feel free to copy the URL and send it to your network. And thank you for helping spread the word about this scam.

can you provide sharing on your site?

When is this going to quit? They say nothing about money if they do something to your computer, and they certainly do not tell you it is going to cost or you have 4 days to cancel. Cancel what? You feel like you have to pay, or they are going to get you.

I feel sorry for anyone who has problems with the scammers. Just get with Microsoft, you can even call them, and they will tell you what to do. They are the ones that gave me the governments number or website. Don't let them win. Help us all.

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