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Consumer Information Blog - for 2014-October

Check out the auto dealer and financing – before you sign

You want to buy a car and need financing, but your credit isn’t so great. Most dealerships have a Finance and Insurance (F&I) Department that will tell you about their financing options. To get the process started, the F&I Department will ask you to complete a credit application, which includes your monthly income and information on current credit accounts, including debt you owe. At least that’s how it’s supposed to work.

Blog Topics: 
Money & Credit

Ad for Gerber baby formula: Deceptively cute

You want the best for your baby. So when you see an ad for formula that claims to help reduce the risk of your child developing allergies, you might be willing to give it a try. Well, hang on to your wallet.

Image of Gerber Good Start Gentle ad

Blog Topics: 
Health & Fitness

Virtual dating left these people with actual disappointment

Okay, so you had some reservations, but you finally decide to try this online dating thing. Your cousin met the love of her life online, so it’s worth a try right? You find a site that offers free membership so you can browse for possible dates without paying up front.

Computer screen with heart icon

FTC sues AT&T for limiting “unlimited data”

“Unlimited data” sounds great, right? Browse the Internet, stream videos, use GPS, even make video calls – all to your heart’s content. But what if you bought an unlimited data plan and then weren’t able to do all those things? That’s what happened to some AT&T customers.  

Blog Topics: 
Money & Credit

What does fraud look like in your community?

All of us are part of some kind of community, however we define that. Asian-American. Service member. Latino. Older adult.

Here at the FTC, we’re wondering what the marketplace looks like in different communities, and thinking about how fraud creeps in. We’ve seen some examples of fraud targeting specific groups. In fact, we recently filed a case against alleged phone scammers who targeted older adults, pretended to be from Medicare, and took millions from consumers’ bank accounts. 

But we want to hear from people working in different communities directly: what does fraud look like where you are?

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FTC publications — free and at your fingertips

When you want free consumer information — for yourself or a group — the FTC is ready to take your order. Looking for identity theft brochures to share with your book club? We’ve got them. Online safety handouts to use in the classroom? Right here. Bookmarks about charity fraud to distribute at a community fair? Absolutely. Our new and better bulkorder site is your gateway to almost 200 free publications for consumers and businesses.

FTC to Webcast the Debt Collection & the Latino Community Roundtable

Staff from the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) and Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) are ready to host the Debt Collection and the Latino Community roundtable, tomorrow, October 23rd, in Long Beach, CA.

Blog Topics: 
Money & Credit

Screening “green” claims

If you want to shop “green,” you might choose a product that says it’s biodegradable, compostable or recyclable. Environmental claims and labels can influence our choices, so it’s important they tell the real story.

Blog Topics: 
Money & Credit

“Free” products weren’t really free

The story: a company says its product will help you lose weight without diet changes or exercise, and you can try it free — 100% satisfaction guaranteed.

The reality: the company can’t support — or deliver on — those weight loss claims. If you give your credit or debit account number, you get charged $60 to $210 every month — and it’s almost impossible to get a refund.

Free Trial Offers Video Thumbnail

Blog Topics: 
Health & Fitness

Beware of mystery shopper scams

I confess… I once was a mystery shopper. Decades ago, I shopped at stores to see what they were charging for certain products and visited restaurant chains to evaluate the food and service. I wrote up a report, sent it in, and received a check for my work. Nothing I could make a living from, but it helped fill the gas tank.

Back then, it didn’t occur to me that responding to a mystery or secret shopper ad could set me up for a scam. Now I know – if you’re looking to make extra money as a mystery shopper, it pays to do some homework to make sure the job is real.

Blog Topics: 
Jobs & Making Money

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