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May 2021

Scammers cash in on confusion over vaccine verification methods

More than a year into the pandemic, and months after the first rollout of COVID-19 vaccines, people are eager to get back to their regular activities. But some activities might require you to show that you’ve been vaccinated or had a recent negative COVID-19 test. How you do that may depend on the activity and where you live. The patchwork approach gives scammers an opportunity to cash in on the confusion. Here are a few ways to help stay ahead of the scammers.

Considering fertility products? Spot the fake claims

People facing difficulties having children often explore fertility products to help them get pregnant. But some products, including some dietary supplements that claim to solve fertility problems, aren’t science-based and can put your health at serious risk.

Blog Topics: 
Health & Fitness

Hang up on auto warranty robocalls

Have you gotten a recorded phone message from “Susie” with the “Vehicle Service Department” calling about your vehicle warranty? That’s, like, so retro. But fanny packs, scrunchies, and tie dye are back — and so are vehicle warranty robocalls.

Blog Topics: 
Money & Credit

Spotting cryptocurrency investment scams

Cryptocurrency has gotten lots of attention as a new way to invest. But here’s the thing: scammers are taking advantage of people’s understanding (or not) of cryptocurrency investments, and how they work. And younger people are losing big.

Share FTC materials here, there, and everywhere

Are you a blogger? Do you publish a newsletter, or post helpful information on social media? May is Older Americans Month, and a great time to help the people you care about learn how to avoid fraud. The FTC's free resources will make your job easier.

Blog Topics: 
Money & Credit

Let’s talk about Coronavirus scams

During this past year, the COVID-19 pandemic and its economic fallout have reminded us how important it is to help each other through difficult times. In May, as we celebrate Older Americans Month, remember that one of the best ways to help your friends and family is to pass on what you know about how to spot and avoid Coronavirus-related scams. 

Blog Topics: 
Money & Credit

Unwanted calls: Just block ’em and report ’em

Unwanted calls are annoying. They can feel like a constant interruption — and many are from scammers. Unfortunately, technology makes it easy for scammers to make millions of calls a day. So this week, as part of Older Americans Month, we’re talking about how to block unwanted calls — for yourself, and for your friends and family.

No money, honey.

t’s never too late to find love, and lots of dating sites and apps are there to help. But scammers are out to steal your heart, too…and then steal your money.

Celebrating Older Americans Month

During May, the FTC and federal and state organizations nationwide will celebrate Older Americans Month, with “Communities of Strength” as its theme. The FTC works to protect older adults year round, through law enforcement actions and the Pass It On fraud prevention campaign. Pass It On encourages people to share what they know to protect someone from a fraud, and to be a resource that others can turn to. This week, we’ll share some of what we know through a series of blogs about scams affecting older adults. We hope you’ll share these blogs in your community. You can link, forward, print, or copy all FTC content freely. And if you’re on social media, share this graphic through your network.

The FTC weighs in on repair restrictions

When you buy a new smartphone, computer, home appliance, or other product, you may not always think about whether it can be fixed if it breaks or has an issue. But here’s the thing: some manufacturers prevent you from fixing the things you buy. They might do things like gluing in batteries, limiting the availability of spare parts, and not giving you the repair instructions and software to help figure out the problem.  

Blog Topics: 
Money & Credit