FTC thwarts company’s mole, skin tag, and wart-removal claims

So, a frog hops into a bar and says, “Hey, did you hear the one about DermaTend?” Apparently, explained the frog, ads said this product removed moles, skin tags and warts — fast and permanently. Better yet, it was supposedly doctor-recommended and clinically proven. Said the frog, “Sounds like the answer to a frog’s dream, right? But then I heard the FTC just filed a complaint in federal court charging the advertiser, Solace International, with deceptive advertising. And that’s no joke.”

According to the FTC — and the frog — Solace charged $39.95 for a pinkie-sized tube of DermaTend and an emery board. The instructions told users to file the mole, skin tag, or wart with the emery board, apply DermaTend, and then wash it off after 45 minutes. But, according to the FTC, this approach was neither doctor-recommended nor clinically proven. Today, the FTC announced that the advertiser has signed an order settling the case. Bottom line: If a business says its health product can do something, the company must have competent and reliable scientific evidence to back it up.

According to the frog, “If you want to get rid of warts, moles or skin tags, it’s best to first check with a healthcare professional. When it comes to treatments for health conditions, it can be tough to tell products and services that work from bottled pond mud. And,” added the frog, “there’s no truth to the myth that frogs cause warts.”

Blog Topics: 
Health & Fitness

Comments

Is DermaNail a product by the same manufacturer as DermaTend? Is it a scam as well? Thanks.

Leave a Comment

Comment Policy

Read Our Privacy Act Statement

It is your choice whether to submit a comment. If you do, you must create a user name, or we will not post your comment. The Federal Trade Commission Act authorizes this information collection for purposes of managing online comments. Comments and user names are part of the Federal Trade Commission’s (FTC) public records system, and user names also are part of the FTC’s computer user records system. We may routinely use these records as described in the FTC’s Privacy Act system notices. For more information on how the FTC handles information that we collect, please read our privacy policy.