Have a question about a dietary supplement? Here’s where to go for answers

You know you need to eat a variety of healthy foods every day to stay healthy. But you may wonder if that’s enough. Should you also be taking supplements? Which ones and how much? Are they safe? Do they work? Will they interact with your medications?

With more than 50,000 supplement products to choose from — pills, powders, drinks, bars — it can be overwhelming. If you go by what you see on daytime talk shows and late night infomercials, these products will help you lose weight without diet or exercise, protect you against colds and flu, keep your heart, brain or liver healthy, and much, much more. But where can you go to cut through the hype and get reliable information?

The federal Office of Dietary Supplements is one excellent source. Part of the National Institutes of Health, the ODS conducts, funds and evaluates research on dietary supplements. They know what works and what doesn’t, what’s safe, and what still needs to be studied.

If those marketing claims for dietary supplements are hard to swallow, and you’re hungry for accurate, science-based information that’s easy to digest, the Office of Dietary Supplements can help. Check out these videos from ODS:

And visit ODS.OD.NIH.GOV for more information.

Blog Topics: 
Health & Fitness

Comments

I thought these sights might actually be able to provide clear details in one reliable site admit supplements and that's not what this is...at all.

What you be really useful, is a list of Dietary Supplements which have been banned or proven ineffective - some comprehensive go-to compilation - so that anyone can check it against what is being sold to make sure it is not harmful!

At NIH, the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine maintains a list of FTC and FDA safety alerts and recalls. See http://nccam.nih.gov/news/alerts.

I found Severa broken links

This web page doesn't help at all!

Quiet helpful, but there are still some issues not answered about dietary supplements.

prevagen - many tv ads, and it is toxic and worthless. a big scam, fda has sued to remove the ad but it takes a long time. cant you do anything about the tv ads. real fraud.

If you see a deceptive ad, you can report it to the FTC at ftc.gov/complaint. The information you give goes into a database that law enforcement uses for investigations.

Blog comments don't go into the database.

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