Health & Fitness

$2.59 million in refunds for Mercola tanning beds

Today, checks went out to 1,367 people who bought a Mercola tanning system after January 1, 2012. Why’s that? Well, in April 2016, the FTC announced a settlement with Joseph Mercola and his companies because, according to the FTC, the ads for Mercola’s products had claims that were false or not backed by science.

The FTC’s sobering truth about Breathometer

Whether you’re gathering with friends for Friday night happy hour or a Super Bowl party to watch the big game, it’s important to get home safely. So wouldn’t it be great if you could transform your smartphone into a breathalyzer to make sure you were safe to drive? Well, Breathometer, Inc., claimed its breathalyzer devices could do just that, and give you the power to make smart decisions while you’re drinking.

Blog Topics: 
Health & Fitness

Order free materials for National Consumer Protection Week 2017

National Consumer Protection Week (NCPW) is around the corner! The annual event – March 5-11, 2017 – is a time to help people understand their consumer rights, make well-informed decisions about money, and spot scams.

Ad hype: True or false?

When it comes to advertising hype, we’ve heard it all. Some can be very appealing: “Shrink two sizes without dieting!” Who wouldn’t love to lose weight or shape up with no effort? Well, the problem is, that’s not how it works. Take a pass on any product that offers weight loss or fitness results without any effort. Remember, no garment, gizmo, or cream is going to make you fit and toned. 

Blog Topics: 
Health & Fitness

Prevagen’s fishy brainpower claims

When an ad suggests a product can improve your memory in 90 days, you might be tempted to buy it. But, if solid science doesn’t back these claims, forget about it.

Blog Topics: 
Health & Fitness

FTC presses Aura over blood pressure app

Apps can add convenience to your daily routine, keep you organized, and help you learn something new — but only if they provide accurate information. If you’re planning to use an app to monitor health conditions — like your blood pressure — talk with your doctor or health care professional first.

 

Blog Topics: 
Health & Fitness

Homeopathy: Not backed by modern science

On your pharmacy’s shelves, mixed in with conventional over-the-counter medicines, you might find products labeled “homeopathic.” Marketers of traditional homeopathic products claim they effectively treat symptoms, but lack reliable scientific evidence to support their claims.

Blog Topics: 
Health & Fitness

FTC eyes comments on Contact Lens Rule

The FTC enforces the Contact Len Rule, which gives you the right to get your contact lens prescription from your eye doctor – whether you ask for it or not – at no extra charge. This right also is known as the automatic prescription release requirement. It allows you to take your prescription wherever you want – online or to the mall – to shop around and look for the best deal. Periodically, the FTC likes to take a look at all its rules to make sure they are up-to-date, effective, and not overly burdensome.

Blog Topics: 
Health & Fitness

Buying cosmetic contact lenses without a prescription is scary

Halloween is right around the corner. And if you’re looking to top off your costume by wearing cosmetic contact lenses, read on.

Blog Topics: 
Health & Fitness

Beware of supplements promising big relief

You might try to get relief from occasional body aches and pains with an over-the-counter treatment. But for people with severe joint stiffness or mobility restrictions due to arthritis or fibromyalgia, it’s a good idea to get medical advice. According to the FTC, some products that claim to treat those serious conditions don’t live up to the hype. Today the FTC announced a settlement against a company that claimed its "clinically proven" supplement promised "complete and long-lasting relief" from joint pain.

Blog Topics: 
Health & Fitness

Pages