You are here

Health & Fitness

Coronavirus: Scammers follow the headlines

Scammers are taking advantage of fears surrounding the Coronavirus. They’re setting up websites to sell bogus products, and using fake emails, texts, and social media posts as a ruse to take your money and get your personal information. Here are some tips to help you keep the scammers at bay.

FTC reaches settlement with anti-aging pill seller

If you remember nothing else from this blog post, remember this: sellers that peddle cures must have scientific proof to back up their claims. The FTC takes action when they don’t.

Blog Topics: 
Health & Fitness

Have you ordered your NCPW materials yet?

March is right around the corner, and you know what that means….it’s almost time for National Consumer Protection Week (NCPW)! This year, NCPW is March 1-7, 2020. That’s just over a month away, so now’s the time to jump into planning.
NCPW is the time of year when government agencies, consumer protection groups, and people like YOU work together to help people understand their consumer rights and make well-informed decisions about money. Want to join in? Here are some ideas:

Supplements for joint pain: don’t believe the hype

If you experience joint pain when you walk or move, promises for a quick and inexpensive cure can be hard to resist. But don’t believe the hype. And don’t assume the people you see in the ads are real.

Blog Topics: 
Health & Fitness

‘Tis the season for ‘open enrollment’ scams

Winter is coming, which means open enrollment season is here. With 2020 just around the corner, now’s the time to add or change your health coverage through Medicare or the Affordable Care Act (ACA). You have until December 7 (Medicare) or December 15 (ACA) to make any changes. As you compare your options, watch out for scams. Here are some tips to protect your wallet and your personal information this open enrollment season.

Blog Topics: 
Health & Fitness

Halloween know-how: Cosmetic contacts require an Rx

Dressing up for Halloween can be fun. Revelers often use make-up, wigs and cosmetic contact lenses to complete their look.

Blog Topics: 
Health & Fitness

Aloe, goodbye: company’s claims lacked proof

You may have heard of using aloe vera for sunburn relief. A Florida company claimed its aloe products would relieve joint and muscle pain, diabetes, acid reflux and more — and that health studies confirmed its claims. Not so, says the FTC. Under an FTC settlement, the company will pay a financial judgment of $537,000 and must stop making health related claims that aren’t supported by the necessary scientific evidence.

Blog Topics: 
Health & Fitness

That attorney’s ad might be bad for your health

You see the ads on TV, hear them on the radio, or read them in print and online: attorneys telling you about the dangers of certain prescription drugs. Many of these ads open with “medical alert,” “health alert” or “consumer alert” to get your attention.

Blog Topics: 
Health & Fitness

Serious health claims for CBD products need proof

Three companies that tout their cannabis-derived products as miracle treatments for serious illnesses have gotten letters from the FTC warning that they’re at risk for legal action unless they have sound scientific evidence to back up their claims.

Blog Topics: 
Health & Fitness

Claims in weight loss ads might be false

Some ads for weight loss products promise miracles. They might say that the product works for everyone or will let you lose weight permanently. Those claims are lies. Dishonest advertisers will tell you anything to get you to buy their product. They might have images of “doctors” in their ads and even “news” reports to make you believe that the product works.Today, the FTC launched a new website, based partly on the LeanSpa case, to help people identify false weight loss claims.

Pages