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Health & Fitness

FTC thwarts company’s mole, skin tag, and wart-removal claims

So, a frog hops into a bar and says, “Hey, did you hear the one about DermaTend?” Apparently, explained the frog, ads said this product removed moles, skin tags and warts — fast and permanently. Better yet, it was supposedly doctor-recommended and clinically proven. Said the frog, “Sounds like the answer to a frog’s dream, right? But then I heard the FTC just filed a complaint in federal court charging the advertiser, Solace International, with deceptive advertising. And that’s no joke.”

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Health & Fitness

Sensa buyers gain refund checks

Close to half a million people who bought Sensa, a sprinkle-on weight loss product, will share more than $26 million in refunds, thanks to the FTC. The money comes from the FTC’s settlement with Sensa’s marketers, who said their powder would help people lose weight. According to the FTC, the company didn’t have the scientific evidence they needed to back up the claims.

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Health & Fitness

Protecting your sensitive health information

Books closed, it’s time for a health privacy pop quiz. What online medical billing company did the FTC allege deceived consumers in an attempt to get their sensitive health information from pharmacies, health insurance companies, and medical labs?

A. Trapper John, M.D.

B. Doogie Howser, M.D.

C. House, M.D.

D. PaymentsMD

Ad for Gerber baby formula: Deceptively cute

You want the best for your baby. So when you see an ad for formula that claims to help reduce the risk of your child developing allergies, you might be willing to give it a try. Well, hang on to your wallet.

Image of Gerber Good Start Gentle ad

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Health & Fitness

“Free” products weren’t really free

The story: a company says its product will help you lose weight without diet changes or exercise, and you can try it free — 100% satisfaction guaranteed.

The reality: the company can’t support — or deliver on — those weight loss claims. If you give your credit or debit account number, you get charged $60 to $210 every month — and it’s almost impossible to get a refund.

Free Trial Offers Video Thumbnail

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Health & Fitness

Have a question about a dietary supplement? Here’s where to go for answers

You know you need to eat a variety of healthy foods every day to stay healthy. But you may wonder if that’s enough. Should you also be taking supplements? Which ones and how much? Are they safe? Do they work? Will they interact with your medications?

Where can you go to cut through the hype and get reliable information? The federal Office of Dietary Supplements is one excellent source.

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Health & Fitness

No support for shapewear’s slimming claims

Imagine wearing an undergarment for eight hours a day for a month to slim inches off your hips and thighs and reduce the unsightly orange peel appearance of cellulite. Yeah, right. In your dreams. Yet, according to the FTC, that’s just what Norm Thompson Outfitters, Inc., and Wacoal America, Inc., claimed in advertising and marketing for their slimming shapewear.

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Health & Fitness

Taken for a glide

Would you be willing to exercise 3 minutes a day to get fit? It’s a compelling proposition. Unfortunately, in the case of the ab GLIDER, lost pounds, body inches, or clothing sizes weren’t just an easy glide away.

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Health & Fitness

These weight loss pills won’t make you “High School Skinny”

Many companies have tag lines designed to catch your attention; many are true and backed up by good, solid evidence. Others… not so much. They may be downright deceptive.

Have you heard this one? “Get High School Skinny!” That’s what marketers of Healthe Trim promised people who bought their line of weight loss supplements. However, according to a settlement announced by the FTC, the company had no scientific evidence that these products actually worked.

Image of Healthe Trim product bottle
 

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Health & Fitness

Wow! Your baby can read? Really?

All parents think their babies rock. But when a company says its product will help a kid master reading Harry Potter during the potty-training years, it needs solid science to support those claims.

The FTC says Dr. Robert Titzer and his company, Infant Learning, Inc., deceived consumers with ads for Your Baby Can Read, a set of DVDs, books and word cards that cost around $200. These ads and other promotional materials promoted the program’s ability to teach babies as young as nine months to read — with their skills advancing to books like Charlotte’s Web by ages three or four.

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Health & Fitness

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