Health & Fitness

Ad hype: True or false?

When it comes to advertising hype, we’ve heard it all. Some can be very appealing: “Shrink two sizes without dieting!” Who wouldn’t love to lose weight or shape up with no effort? Well, the problem is, that’s not how it works. Take a pass on any product that offers weight loss or fitness results without any effort. Remember, no garment, gizmo, or cream is going to make you fit and toned. 

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Health & Fitness

Prevagen’s fishy brainpower claims

When an ad suggests a product can improve your memory in 90 days, you might be tempted to buy it. But, if solid science doesn’t back these claims, forget about it.

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Health & Fitness

FTC presses Aura over blood pressure app

Apps can add convenience to your daily routine, keep you organized, and help you learn something new — but only if they provide accurate information. If you’re planning to use an app to monitor health conditions — like your blood pressure — talk with your doctor or health care professional first.

 

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Health & Fitness

Homeopathy: Not backed by modern science

On your pharmacy’s shelves, mixed in with conventional over-the-counter medicines, you might find products labeled “homeopathic.” Marketers of traditional homeopathic products claim they effectively treat symptoms, but lack reliable scientific evidence to support their claims.

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Health & Fitness

FTC eyes comments on Contact Lens Rule

The FTC enforces the Contact Len Rule, which gives you the right to get your contact lens prescription from your eye doctor – whether you ask for it or not – at no extra charge. This right also is known as the automatic prescription release requirement. It allows you to take your prescription wherever you want – online or to the mall – to shop around and look for the best deal. Periodically, the FTC likes to take a look at all its rules to make sure they are up-to-date, effective, and not overly burdensome.

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Health & Fitness

Buying cosmetic contact lenses without a prescription is scary

Halloween is right around the corner. And if you’re looking to top off your costume by wearing cosmetic contact lenses, read on.

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Health & Fitness

Beware of supplements promising big relief

You might try to get relief from occasional body aches and pains with an over-the-counter treatment. But for people with severe joint stiffness or mobility restrictions due to arthritis or fibromyalgia, it’s a good idea to get medical advice. According to the FTC, some products that claim to treat those serious conditions don’t live up to the hype. Today the FTC announced a settlement against a company that claimed its "clinically proven" supplement promised "complete and long-lasting relief" from joint pain.

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Health & Fitness

“Free” trials can cost you

The best things in life are free … or are they? Not when a “free” trial ends up costing you money. That’s what happened to many people who signed up for “free” samples from NutraClick, according to the FTC’s latest case.

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Health & Fitness

FTC and CDC Twitter Chat for Contact Lens Health Week

To promote Contact Lens Health Week, the FTC will be a guest on a live Twitter chat hosted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The chat is scheduled for Monday, August 22 at Noon Eastern.

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Health & Fitness

Will those insect repellents protect you from Zika?

Mosquitoes are in the news — and in popular vacation spots. If you’re worried about the Zika virus or other mosquito-borne diseases, you’ll find all sorts of products — including wristbands, stickers, and patches — that say they’ll repel mosquitos that carry Zika. But do they really work? Are you and your family as protected as they claim?

Maybe not. The FTC is concerned that some products don’t work as advertised. That’s why the FTC sent warning letters to 10 companies selling these products, urging them to remove any health claims that aren’t backed by scientific evidence — especially claims about preventing Zika and other mosquito-borne diseases.

So how can you be sure you’re buying an insect repellent that works as promised?

image of mosquito

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