Health & Fitness

Buying cosmetic contact lenses without a prescription is scary

Halloween is right around the corner. And if you’re looking to top off your costume by wearing cosmetic contact lenses, read on.

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Health & Fitness

Beware of supplements promising big relief

You might try to get relief from occasional body aches and pains with an over-the-counter treatment. But for people with severe joint stiffness or mobility restrictions due to arthritis or fibromyalgia, it’s a good idea to get medical advice. According to the FTC, some products that claim to treat those serious conditions don’t live up to the hype. Today the FTC announced a settlement against a company that claimed its "clinically proven" supplement promised "complete and long-lasting relief" from joint pain.

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Health & Fitness

“Free” trials can cost you

The best things in life are free … or are they? Not when a “free” trial ends up costing you money. That’s what happened to many people who signed up for “free” samples from NutraClick, according to the FTC’s latest case.

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Health & Fitness

FTC and CDC Twitter Chat for Contact Lens Health Week

To promote Contact Lens Health Week, the FTC will be a guest on a live Twitter chat hosted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The chat is scheduled for Monday, August 22 at Noon Eastern.

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Health & Fitness

Will those insect repellents protect you from Zika?

Mosquitoes are in the news — and in popular vacation spots. If you’re worried about the Zika virus or other mosquito-borne diseases, you’ll find all sorts of products — including wristbands, stickers, and patches — that say they’ll repel mosquitos that carry Zika. But do they really work? Are you and your family as protected as they claim?

Maybe not. The FTC is concerned that some products don’t work as advertised. That’s why the FTC sent warning letters to 10 companies selling these products, urging them to remove any health claims that aren’t backed by scientific evidence — especially claims about preventing Zika and other mosquito-borne diseases.

So how can you be sure you’re buying an insect repellent that works as promised?

image of mosquito

Pet food that makes your dog live longer?

Dogs are more than pets — they’re furry family members. If you thought you could help your dog live 30% longer just by choosing different dog food, would you pass up the chance?

That’s exactly what ads for Eukanuba dog food claimed it could do. But according to an FTC settlement with Mars Petcare US announced today, it wasn’t true.

Refunds for Kevin Trudeau’s victims

Hundreds of thousands of people who bought Kevin Trudeau’s book “The Weight Loss Cure ‘They’ Don’t Want You to Know About” after watching his deceptive infomercials will get money back, thanks to the FTC.

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Health & Fitness

“Doctor Trusted” couldn’t be trusted

Do you ever shop online for health products, like dietary supplements? Maybe you’ve seen various seals and certificates on sites you visit — showing that a site is secure, or that products on the site have been tested and evaluated. You’d think you could trust those seals and certificates — but unfortunately, that’s not always the case.

The FTC recently announced a settlement with SmartClick Media, a company that sold deceptive “Doctor Trusted” health seals to over 800 websites.

Fake friends, fake news, phony weight-loss promises

An email from a friend urges you to try new weight-loss pills. There’s a link to an article about a celebrity’s amazing results with the pills, and the article’s author says he even tried this miracle product himself.

With all these trusted sources, why wouldn’t you give it a try?

Before you get on the brain train…

What if you could substantially improve your school grades, standardized test scores, athletic performance, and future earning abilities? You might be interested, right?

That’s just what ads from LearningRx Franchise Corporation, the company that runs a network of more than 80 learning centers, promised its “brain training” programs could do. Some ads went further, claiming the programs are clinically proven to help permanently overcome the symptoms of ADHD, autism, age-related cognitive decline, Alzheimer’s disease, strokes, and traumatic brain injuries. Customers often spent thousands of dollars for the company’s programs, which could take months to complete.

But before you get on the brain train, know this: These claims are unproven, according to an FTC complaint. Learning Rx has agreed to settle the FTC's charges.

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Health & Fitness

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