Health & Fitness

Pressing Questions

On Friday, many of my colleagues will be joining the US Department of Justice’s Civil Consumer Protection Branch at the Second Annual Consumer Protection Summit.

On the agenda for the day are these hot topics...

This is National Consumer Protection Week!

National Consumer Protection Weeks begins today, and it’s the biggest and best NCPW in 15 years. Thanks to 64 federal, state and local agencies and nonprofits that are putting the spotlight on the critical consumer protection work they do year-round, consumers have easy access to a tremendous variety of timely, useful information about recognizing and reporting frauds and scams, managing credit and debt, using technology, and staying healthy and safe.

Trending

In 2012, the FTC received more than 2 million consumer complaints – a first in the history of the Consumer Sentinel Network. The #1 category of complaints? Identity theft. This tidbit is from the hot-off-the-press Consumer Sentinel Network Data Book 2012, a fascinating analysis of complaints received in Sentinel during the previous calendar year. Sentinel is a secure online database available to more than 2,000 civil and criminal law enforcement agencies across the country. Agencies use the data to research cases, identify victims, and track possible targets.

Want to learn more about the top ten complaint categories, get national data, and state-by-state accountings of the top complaints? Check out the 2012 Sentinel Data Book.

Trusting Your Sources

You read the news to get the facts. But what happens when that “newsy” site isn’t news at all?

A company that used fake news sites to push acai berry supplements and other weight loss products has agreed to settle FTC charges. The agency has already stopped others that used wanna-be news sites and phony testimonials from supposed reporters to push their products. The M.O. is to make people think the site — and the reporters — are part of legitimate and trusted news organizations, name-dropping CNN and Consumer Reports, among others, to add credibility. But the fact is the sites were ads, masquerading as news.

Blog Topics: 
Health & Fitness

Gear up for a Great National Consumer Protection Week!

The 15th annual National Consumer Protection Week (NCPW) is March 3 - 9. Government agencies, advocacy organizations, and private sector groups from coast to coast have come together here to share information that can help you make smart decisions about a slew of subjects, including privacy protection, money and debt management, and recognizing identity theft, frauds and scams.

New Year’s Resolution: Don’t Buy into Diet Ads

Let me guess… one of your resolutions is to lose weight this year. And, sure, there are products that claim they can help you shed the weight. But an FTC case reveals some weight-loss claims are hard to swallow.

Got a minute? Get the skinny on diet ads and weight-loss products from the FTC’s new audio tip.

Diet Ads

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Health & Fitness

A Healthy Dose of Skepticism

New products that make big claims about health benefits seem to pop up all the time — like ads for dietary supplements that claim they can help you lose weight, get allergies under control, or prevent the common cold. But how do you know if those claims are true?

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Health & Fitness

Welcome to the FTC’s Home for Consumer Information

Looking for consumer resources from the FTC? They're at consumer.ftc.gov, a new URL for information from the nation's consumer protection agency.

A Spirited Closing Letter

Scammers Out to Profit on U. S. Supreme Court's Ruling on the Affordable Care Act

It's enough to make you sick. No sooner had the U.S. Supreme Court ruled on the Affordable Care Act than scam artists began working the phones. Claiming to be from the government, they're saying that under the Affordable Care Act, they need to verify some information. For example, they might have the routing number of the person's bank, and then use that information to get the person to reveal the entire account number. Other times, they have asked for credit card numbers, Social Security numbers, Medicare ID, or other personal information.

Blog Topics: 
Health & Fitness

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