Jobs & Making Money

Honor Our Vets

Veterans Day is a special time to honor all those who have served our country. According to the Department of Veterans Affairs, more than 22 million veterans live in the U.S. today. And yet, for all the grateful Americans who celebrate these heroes, there are scammers trying to take advantage of veterans and current servicemembers.

The FTC’s Consumer Center has loads of information to help veterans and their families fight back against fraudsters.

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Jobs & Making Money

If You’re Considering a Vocational School…

Going to a vocational school, also known as a trade, career or correspondence school, can be an effective way to train for a skilled job as an automotive technician, medical assistant, electronics technician, or any of a number of other positions. Before you commit to a school, though, it’s a good idea to research its training program, its record of placing graduates in jobs, and its fees.

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Jobs & Making Money

Veterans: Don’t Get Schooled

You’ve served the nation and maybe you’re thinking about heading back to school to start the next chapter of your career. Colleges are there to help you, right? Hmm, not so fast. Not every school has got your back. Some for-profit schools may care more about boosting their bottom line with your VA education benefits. Some may even stretch the truth to persuade you to enroll, either by pressuring you to sign up for courses that don’t suit your needs or to take out loans that will be a challenge to pay off. In 2010, the Inspector General of the U.S. Department of Education (ED) said that 70% of the agency’s current fraud investigations were focused on for-profit schools.

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Jobs & Making Money

Hispanic Heritage Month: Keeping It Simple

To conclude our celebration of Hispanic Heritage Month, we’re highlighting consumer.gov, a site that features consumer protection basics, plain and simple.

A Biz Opp Breakdown

Be your own boss! No experience necessary! Make $60,000 a year from home! Sounds pretty good, huh? Before you sign on the dotted line, you might want to listen to this 1-minute tip from the FTC...

Audio Tips Icon

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Jobs & Making Money

Phone-y Funds for Furloughed Feds

As a government employee, are you eligible for a free government grant? Sorry, but no, despite the calls you may be getting.

a pile of money

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Jobs & Making Money

Everything Is Illuminated

Earlier this week, more than 50 legal services practitioners joined together with staff from the FTC, USCIS, DOJ, the CFTC, the CFPB, and the SEC to talk about scams against the immigrant community – present and future.

The results of the half-day forum were illuminating for all of us. We found out about all sorts of creative scams targeting immigrants – more about that in a minute. But, just as important, we heard about the hard work and creative solutions that advocates are undertaking to help protect immigrant communities.

Your First Line of Defense

We’re all consumers and information is the first line of defense in the marketplace. Everyone can benefit from amping up their consumer know-how and getting the inside skinny on avoiding scams. That’s true for servicemembers, veterans, and their families, too. And that’s the spirit behind Military Consumer Protection Day, July 17. The FTC, the Department of Defense, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, and Military Saves have teamed up for this first ever MCPD to kick off a year-round campaign to empower the military and veteran communities.

MCPD

The Rap on Car Wrap Scams

A new variation of the fake check scam is making the rounds. It works like this: scammers place ads on the internet or send mass emails to attract people looking for extra money. They claim they will pay to shrink-wrap your car with an advertisement of a popular company. All you have to do is drive your car as you normally would.

A Strange Affinity

Do you trust people more if they’re like you, or a part of your community? Scammers bet that you do. Every day, they take advantage of that unconscious trust.

It’s called “affinity fraud” — when someone in a group uses their membership in that group to scam another member. Think religious, ethnic, or professional groups. Might you be willing to hear more about a deal if a member of your church asks you to? Or take advice from someone who speaks your same language? Through the FTC’s Legal Services Collaboration, we’ve heard of cases just like that.

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