The land of the free trials

Whether or not we want to admit it, many of us are fascinated by clever infomercials or promotions for the latest gadget or invention. The land of the free is also the home of clever inventors and marketers who work hard to sell products that – they hope – make our life easier. 

To help you decide whether to get a new product, many marketers will let you try it “for free,” or “risk-free,” or “at no obligation.” Trouble is, some sellers lure you into these so-called “free” trials… and then keep billing you after the trial is over. Some even sign you up for other products or services you don’t want.

Here’s a quick video on how to protect yourself from the perils of so-called free trials. Because, sometimes, “free” can turn out to be quite expensive.


Blog Topics: 
Money & Credit


Free trials You always burn me Really I don't believe I can trust you

I had ordered a "FREE" Jar of Face Cream.I canceled it 2 days before the trial period was over and was told that I was to late to cancel and my new shipment was already on its way and also a charge of $ 78.00 Thank god I have a Discover Card and the charge was canceled. I never received the next Jar of Face cream and never heard from that Company again.

i need help avoid it. thank you for your loving kindness.

Good consumer education ideas. Thank you.


So true. Thank you for the post.

Its been 2 plus years since they tried to blow me up in my car I just need to talk to someone and retrieve an identity

For help with identity theft, go to You can report identity theft to the FTC, and get letters and pre-printed forms to help you fix problems with creditors and businesses. You will get a personal recovery plan to help you fix problems caused by identity theft.

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