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Limiting Unwanted Calls & Emails

“Pass it On” at the holidays

Holidays often mean time with family and friends. If you’re looking for conversation starters that avoid tricky topics – like who should’ve won the World Series – why not chat about scams? Pass it On, an FTC education campaign, gives you new ways to talk about scams and how to prevent them.

Scams and older consumers: Looking at the data

The FTC just sent a report to Congress called Protecting Older Consumers 2018-2019. The report suggests steps to take to help protect older consumers from fraud. But the evidence also shows a thing or two everyone else can learn from them. Check out the sometimes surprising findings in this year’s report.

What Do Not Call complaints are telling us

Have you gotten a call from an imposter, maybe someone pretending to be with the Social Security Administration, IRS, or a tech support company, this year? If so, you’re not alone. Calls from imposters were the most-reported topic of unwanted calls to the FTC over the past year (FY2019).

You can see our annual report on Do Not Call complaints, with state-specific data. But here are some key takeaways.

Who’s reporting robocalls?

Have you ever reported an unwanted call to the FTC, whether it’s a robocall (where you hear a recorded message) or call from a live person? If so, thank you. Reporting, I’m sorry to say, won’t end these annoying calls, but it helps the FTC and other law enforcement agencies investigate and bring cases against scammers and businesses that aren’t following the law. In fact, the FTC’s recent actions against robocallers show what your report can do. While you won’t always know how your report made a difference, you can find out more about calls people like you are reporting to the FTC, across the U.S. or in your community. The FTC’s Do Not Call data is now available in an interactive format

FTC and partners tell robocallers to call it quits

Tired of robocalls? So are we. Today the FTC and state and federal partners announced Operation Call it Quits, an effort to go after robocallers. As part of the announcement, the FTC has new videos, infographics, and articles you can watch, read, and share at ftc.gov/calls.

What to do about robocalls

Not another robocall! We’ve all felt that way. Wondering what to do about robocalls? Check out this new video:

Those (not really) IRS calls

You’ve probably gotten one of these calls: They say it’s the IRS and they’re filing a lawsuit against you for back taxes. They may threaten to arrest or deport you. What do you do? Watch this video to learn more:

Protect yourself against Medicare scams

Still getting calls from people claiming to be from Medicare, asking for money or personal information? Watch this video about how you can protect yourself from Medicare scams:

Untangling a robocaller web

Sick of getting robocalls and other unwanted calls? You can learn more about how to block them at ftc.gov/calls.

You also might know that the FTC continues to go after the people and companies behind these calls. Case in point: today the FTC announced a case against a group of defendants that it alleges are responsible for billions of illegal robocalls.

That’s not your neighbor calling

When your phone rings and it looks like a local call, you may be more likely to answer. Scammers count on this and can easily fake caller ID numbers. They even can match the first six digits of your own number, which is called “neighbor spoofing.”