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Limiting Unwanted Calls & Emails

Robocall reports still down, FTC still fighting

A couple months ago, we told you the good news that people had been reporting getting fewer robocalls, and we told you about how some of the FTC’s work might have played a part in that. We have more good news — the number of reported robocalls for April and May were even lower. Maybe you’ve noticed.

Avoiding SSA scams during COVID-19

While some of you are home, practicing social distancing and frequent hand washing to avoid the Coronavirus, remember that scammers are still busy trying to take advantage of people. Some scammers are pretending to be from the Social Security Administration (SSA) and trying to get your Social Security number or your money.

Grandparent scams in the age of Coronavirus

“Grandma: I’m in the hospital, sick, please wire money right away.” “Grandpa: I’m stuck overseas, please send money.” Grandparent scams can take a new twist – and a new sense of urgency – in these days of Coronavirus. Here’s what to keep in mind.

Socially distancing from COVID-19 robocall scams

Scammers – and scammy companies – are using illegal robocalls to profit from Coronavirus-related fears. Listen to some of the latest scammy robocall pitches, so you can be on the lookout and know how to respond. (Here’s a hint: hang up!)

Getting bombarded by scam calls? You’re not alone.

The Social Security Administration (SSA) scam is the number one scam reported to the FTC right now.

As soon as a caller threatens you, or demands you pay them with a gift card or by wiring money, it’s a scam. Even if the caller ID tells you otherwise.

“Pass it On” at the holidays

Holidays often mean time with family and friends. If you’re looking for conversation starters that avoid tricky topics – like who should’ve won the World Series – why not chat about scams? Pass it On, an FTC education campaign, gives you new ways to talk about scams and how to prevent them.

Scams and older consumers: Looking at the data

The FTC just sent a report to Congress called Protecting Older Consumers 2018-2019. The report suggests steps to take to help protect older consumers from fraud. But the evidence also shows a thing or two everyone else can learn from them. Check out the sometimes surprising findings in this year’s report.

What Do Not Call complaints are telling us

Have you gotten a call from an imposter, maybe someone pretending to be with the Social Security Administration, IRS, or a tech support company, this year? If so, you’re not alone. Calls from imposters were the most-reported topic of unwanted calls to the FTC over the past year (FY2019).

You can see our annual report on Do Not Call complaints, with state-specific data. But here are some key takeaways.

Who’s reporting robocalls?

Have you ever reported an unwanted call to the FTC, whether it’s a robocall (where you hear a recorded message) or call from a live person? If so, thank you. Reporting, I’m sorry to say, won’t end these annoying calls, but it helps the FTC and other law enforcement agencies investigate and bring cases against scammers and businesses that aren’t following the law. In fact, the FTC’s recent actions against robocallers show what your report can do. While you won’t always know how your report made a difference, you can find out more about calls people like you are reporting to the FTC, across the U.S. or in your community. The FTC’s Do Not Call data is now available in an interactive format

FTC and partners tell robocallers to call it quits

Tired of robocalls? So are we. Today the FTC and state and federal partners announced Operation Call it Quits, an effort to go after robocallers. As part of the announcement, the FTC has new videos, infographics, and articles you can watch, read, and share at ftc.gov/calls.

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