Money & Credit

Defendant pays the price for selling fake consumer debt portfolios

Debt buying is big business. That’s the sale of old debt, for pennies on the dollar, by creditors to buyers who then attempt to collect the debt or sell it to other buyers. But when a person or company sells fake debt portfolios, that’s fraud

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Money & Credit

Don’t pay for a car with Amazon gift cards. Ever.

We’ve written before about scammers who trick people into paying with iTunes gift cards. The latest? They’re asking people to pay for big online purchases — like cars, motorcycles, boats, RVs and tractors — with Amazon gift cards.

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Money & Credit

FTC sues D-Link over router and camera security flaws

If you’ve got a wireless network, your wireless router connects your computer and other devices to the internet. If it’s reasonably designed and configured, the router also is a gate that should prevent hackers from accessing your devices and data. Hackers have used unsecured internet-connected devices, like routers and cameras, to steal people’s data, spy on their activities, and even bring down important websites. So it’s pretty important that routers – key connections to the internet – are secured, right?

The FTC thinks so, which is why today we’re suing the makers and distributors of D-Link products, for failing to take reasonable steps to secure their routers and IP cameras.

Police raids in India cut down IRS imposter calls

Over the last few years, we’ve warned about a lot of imposter scams. In one of the most common types, callers pretending to be from the IRS demand payments and threaten to arrest people.

Last fall, we mentioned raids on illegal telemarketing operations by the police in India. After that, the US Department of Justice indicted dozens of scammers who also were impersonating the IRS. After those actions, the number of IRS imposter scams reported to the FTC plummeted. On Tuesday, the New York Times ran a behind-the-scenes look at the call centers and the raids that took them down. It’s a great reminder that scammers are organized, and they’re really good liars.

Budgeting for the new year

If you had a dollar for every New Year’s resolution you’ve broken, what would you do with all that money? If spending was your first thought, here’s a resolution that can help your money grow: create and use a budget in the new year. Start by taking these steps to make a budget.

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Money & Credit

Repaying student loans? Read this

If you’re paying back your federal student loans, you might be interested in online ads saying things like, “Erase Default Statuses in 4–6 Weeks!” or – for the next few weeks – “Obama Wants to Forgive Your Student Loans!” Erasing default and loan forgiveness – sounds great to someone who owes a bundle, right?

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Money & Credit

A debt collection round-up

We ended 2015 by announcing Operation Collection Protection, a massive, nationwide enforcement initiative, targeting illegal debt collection practices at the federal, state, and local levels. Since then, the FTC and its partners have been busy bringing more actions against debt collectors who are unlicensed, deceptive or abusive. As Operation Collection Protection comes to a close, here’s a look back at what was accomplished.

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Money & Credit

FTC Workshop: Changing demographics, evolving conversations

The Federal Trade Commission recently held “The Changing Consumer Demographics” workshop to examine demographic shifts.As the U.S. population ages and gets more diverse, consumer protection strategies must evolve to make sure we’re protecting all communities. Workshop participants, including expert demographers and leaders in marketing, consumer advocacy, and law enforcement, discussed what the population will look like in the future – and what that means for consumer protection.

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Money & Credit

There’s an app for that (but it might be fake)

As more and more consumers are shopping with mobile apps, fraudsters are following the money. There are fake phone apps popping up that impersonate well-known retailers in order to steal your personal information. Their names are similar to well-known brands, and their descriptions promise enticing deals or features.But these fraudulent apps can take your credit card or bank information. Some fake apps may even install malware onto your phone and demand money from you to unlock it.

When fake fur is real

Do you have faux fur on your holiday wish list – maybe a jacket, hat or throw? It turns out that some faux fur is actually real fur, but manufacturers and retailers say it’s fake. And misleading people is against the law.

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Money & Credit

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