Money & Credit

Scam-proof your doorstep

Nowadays, you can encounter a scam artist just about anywhere — online, over the phone and even at your door. Here are a few ruses that might come a’ knocking, and tips to avoid getting taken.

Who’s brokering your data?

If the friend of a friend is my friend, and the enemy of a friend is my enemy, then is the seller of data to a scammer also a scammer? In a case announced today, the FTC said it might well be.

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Money & Credit

Weather emergencies: Getting your financial house in order

When it comes to preparing for a weather emergency, a flashlight with fully charged batteries is a must. Know what else can make life after a storm easier? If your financial documents are up-to-date, in one place, and portable. Consider scanning your documents or moving them online so you have a digital record of them, as well. Here’s a basic list of what to gather.

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Money & Credit

Back-to-school shopping tips from the FTC

From crayons to clothing and computers, it’s back-to-school shopping time! Before you head to the mall or go online, the FTC has some tips to help you get the most for your money.

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Money & Credit

Avoiding Money Wiring Scams

Imposters. Impersonators. Fakes. Frauds. Phonies. You might call them by different names but these scam artists have one thing in common: they pretend to be someone they aren’t and tell you a bogus story to con you into wiring them money.

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Money & Credit

How to dispute credit report information that can’t be confirmed

Would you know what to do if a debt collector reported a debt to a credit reporting agency and then went out of business, leaving no one to confirm or legally collect the debt?

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Money & Credit

Life happens…

What’s going on in your life today? Preparing to graduate? Have a changing family dynamic? Returning from military service? Or just moving into this country?

Big life changes seem to come frequently, and they don’t just impact your daily routine — they can affect your finances, too. Here are some ideas to help you land on your feet when you face a change.

Card cracking: Not what it’s cracked up to be

The scam is called card cracking and it may start off innocently enough. You see a post on a social media site announcing a contest. Or maybe a webpage that claims to have a celebrity affiliation is offering a gift card giveaway.
The variations are endless, but here’s the tip-off that fraud is afoot. At some point, you’re asked for your bank account information, PIN number, or online banking credential. That’s when you can bank on the fact that those “innocent” offers aren’t what they’re cracked up to be.

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Money & Credit

Adiós fake debt collectors

“No hay mal, que por bien no venga,” as we say in Spanish. There’s nothing bad through which good doesn’t come.
It’s an appropriate phrase to describe the FTC’s settlement with Centro Natural – a telemarketing company that the FTC says deceived and harassed Spanish-speaking people into paying debts they didn’t owe. Thanks to the settlement, announced recently, the company is now banned from telemarketing and debt collecting. It’s an important case, because fraud really does affect every community. The case also aligns with the FTC’s work on how debt collection and credit reporting issues affect Latino consumers.

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Money & Credit

It’s criminal

The Department of Justice (DOJ) recently announced the extradition of six Nigerian nationals from South Africa to Mississippi to face a nine-count federal indictment for various Internet frauds. These six people join 15 others who were previously charged with, among other things, conspiracy to commit mail fraud, wire fraud, bank fraud, identity theft, and money laundering.
What were the scams? According to the indictment, the defendants found and reached out to their potential victims through online dating websites and work-at-home opportunities.

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