You are here

Privacy, Identity & Online Security

Don’t send them money

Family emergency scams try to scare people into sending money to help a loved one in trouble. The fraud can play out in many ways, but the hustle is the same: the caller lies, tries to scare you, and rushes you to pay so you don’t have time to think twice or check things out before you send money. And once you do that, you’ll never get it back.

Hello, summer. Goodbye, scammers.

Summer is right around the corner. With things reopening, kids getting out of school, and days lasting longer, this summer promises, we hope, some much-needed relaxation, adventure, and a chance to reconnect with family and friends. Today, we’re kicking off our summer safety series to share some thoughts on ways to make your summer season as enjoyable and safe as possible.

How to spot a government impersonator scam

Scammers often disguise themselves as people working for the government and might pretend to offer help. But, really, they’re after your money or personal information. For Pride Month, the FTC wants the LGBTQ+ community to know about government imposter scams and how to avoid them.

Celebrate Pride by fighting fraud

Pride Month is all about getting out there, connecting, and showing support for the LGBTQ+ community. Here’s an idea: let’s also make it about helping the people you care about avoid scams.

Stand up to cyberbullying

Pride Month is about connecting with and showing support for people in the LGTBQ+ community. It’s also about standing up and protecting those we care for, so today we’re talking about cyberbullying.

Happy Pride Month from the FTC

June is Pride Month, an important time of year when we get to celebrate and show our support for LGBTQ+ people everywhere. Here at the FTC, “pride” is more than a month-long celebration. We’re proud of the work we’re doing throughout the year to help protect the LGBTQ+ community from fraud — especially our work to help the community learn how to spot, avoid, and report scams and bad business practices.

Your guide to protecting your privacy online

The things we do throughout the course of our day give businesses access to information about our habits, tastes, and activities. Some might use it to deliver targeted ads to you, or to give you content based on your location, like stores nearby or the weather forecast. Others might sell or share that information. Whether you use a computer, tablet, or mobile phone to go online, there are things you can do to protect your privacy.

Scammers cash in on confusion over vaccine verification methods

More than a year into the pandemic, and months after the first rollout of COVID-19 vaccines, people are eager to get back to their regular activities. But some activities might require you to show that you’ve been vaccinated or had a recent negative COVID-19 test. How you do that may depend on the activity and where you live. The patchwork approach gives scammers an opportunity to cash in on the confusion. Here are a few ways to help stay ahead of the scammers.

Unwanted calls: Just block ’em and report ’em

Unwanted calls are annoying. They can feel like a constant interruption — and many are from scammers. Unfortunately, technology makes it easy for scammers to make millions of calls a day. So this week, as part of Older Americans Month, we’re talking about how to block unwanted calls — for yourself, and for your friends and family.

No money, honey.

t’s never too late to find love, and lots of dating sites and apps are there to help. But scammers are out to steal your heart, too…and then steal your money.

Pages