Say no thanks to charity cheats

Gift box wrapped with moneyAs fall weather cools down, plans for Thanksgiving and the charitable giving season are heating up. Here come the requests for donations — in your mail and email, in person, on social networking sites, through your mobile devices — you name it. Want to express your thankfulness with a gift to a charity? Find an organization that spends wisely on a cause you support, and screen out any requests scammers send your way.

If you get a request from an unfamiliar group:

  • Double-check the group’s name to see if it’s legitimate. A scammer may use a name that looks or sounds like a reputable organization and hope you won’t catch it.
  • Go to the group’s website to see how it spends its money. Some charities use money effectively to support their missions; others spend a large share on fundraising or administrative costs.
  • Look into the group’s mission. An organization with the word “children” in the title might support research about children, give books to children, or work with kids locally or internationally. Find a charity that supports the issues that matter to you.
  • See what others say about the organization. The Better Business Bureau’s (BBB) Wise Giving Alliance, Charity Navigator, Charity Watch, and GuideStar rate charities.
  • Use this Internal Revenue Service (IRS) site to see if the organization is eligible to receive tax-deductible contributions.

Say ‘no’ if anyone asks for money, but:

  • refuses to give you full details about the group’s identity, mission, costs and how it will use your donation
  • uses high-pressure tactics, like trying to get you to donate immediately, before you can do research or think it over
  • asks you to send cash or use a money transfer
  • promises to enter you in a sweepstakes or give you a prize for donating.

Donating to Charity?

Blog Topics: 
Money & Credit


I cannot rightfully say that hatch acts where politicians take what doesn't belong to them Is the same thing as giving to charity


Can I talk to some one

If you want to file a consumer complaint with the FTC and prefer to do it over the phone instead of filing the complaint online, call1-888-FTC-HELP.

I only donate to local shelters that I can easily visit and speak to the individuals who were there. Most of the local shelters in my area are staffed by volunteers, who are not paid a nickel, and they certainly do not have the kind of budget avaialble to hire a commercial fund raising call center, like the ones who are calling people (usually for very legitimate organizatons.) The big problem I have with these prefessional fund raising organizations, is that they typically eat up close to 60 per cent or more of the donations they raise paying themselves and their workers. The smaller animal rescues that I work with tend to raise smaller amounts of money~~~but a larger percentage of the earnings are used for the actual work that it's intended for, rather than paying staff or paying a third party company to run a call center and harass donors to the point that their turned off or fear that their being scammed. I would encourage everyone to donate directy to their favorite charity, remember that your dollars go much further when you keep it close to home. And if you don't feel that you have money to give, a few hours of your time, even 3-6 hours or 5-10 hours a month is hugely appreciated, as well as maybe working to feed people in on holidays, or donate used goods~~or an old beat up car. Nothing goes to waste, and the local small organizations truly need your support the most.

Problem is that checking with BBB is worthless. Most people think the BBB is a place to report bad business practice. BBB is a member only group that protects businesses. It doesn't care about businesses that are illegal, ripoffs, scams, ... Most people don't get that.

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