Scam du jour: Chip card scams

Recently, I told you about the new credit and debit chip cards designed to reduce fraud, including counterfeiting.

Now, I'm reporting on scammers who are trying to take advantage of the millions of consumers who haven't yet received a chip card.

Here's what’s happening: Scammers are emailing people, posing as their card issuer. The scammers claim that in order to issue a new chip card, you need to update your account by confirming some personal information or clicking on a link to continue the process.

If you reply to the email with personal information, the scammer can use it to commit identity theft. If you click on the link, you may unknowingly install malware on your device. Malware programs can cause your device to crash, monitor your online activity, send spam, steal personal information and commit fraud.

So how can you tell if the email is from a scammer?

  • There's no reason your card issuer needs to contact you by email — or by phone, for that matter — to confirm personal information before sending you a new chip card. Don't respond to an email or phone call that asks you to provide your card number. Period.
  • Still not sure if the email is a scam? Contact your card issuers at the phone numbers on your cards.
  • Don't trust links in emails. Only provide personal information through a company's website if you typed in the web address yourself and you see signals that the site is secure, like a URL that begins https (the "s" stands for secure).

To learn more about protecting your personal information, check out Privacy & Identity.

Blog Topics: 
Money & Credit


Thanks for the head up on these new scammers who are trying to deceive people concerning their debit and credit card. We will be on the lookout for these emails and phone calls.Thanks.

Thank you for information for I know i got hacked and my bank account as well and not by a chip card it was me doing a loan app on line so i learned my lesson the hard way so please take this serious !!!

Thank you for the information.

Thank you for this information!

My bank e-mailed alerting me of the new card that they will be sending and the type of envelope it will be in.they did not ask for any information on my account.

Thanks for all the useful information you provide about scams. It helps us to avoid them.

Thanks for information

I have a protection for my ID and credit card, I fell secure because I already had hackers in my computer and ask me for money.

I think a lot of this problem could be stopped simply by making it illegal to spoof emails, and once that law is in place, forcing ISP's to comply by not sending an e-mail that cannot be verified to have been sent from the MX servers of the entity sending it. ISP's play a large role in allowing email Headers to be falsified in any way regardless o the source. Spoof it,and no delivery.

Twane, that is an excellent idea. Cell phone providers make money every time a user answers a telemarketing call. When i asked verizon for the real number behind the spoofed one, they actually told me they couldn'tell me due to privacy concerns. We need laws to get them involved in solving the problem. As long as they are making some money on these calls they have no incentive to help with the problem.

I find the best thing for me is to not answer any calls I don't recognize. Let them go to voice mail - either on a land line or cell phone.

there's always someone looking for easy money. be vigilant and trust your instincts.

always helpful from FTC.
I am able to avoid scams because of FTC!

The reality is that even the newly issued chip cards are woefully insecure. For one thing, most of those issued by U.S. Financial institutions also have magnetic strips, totally defeating the purpose for which chips were devised - to prevent unauthorized access to the car downer,s personal profile. For another, a thief can still use the card anywhere a pin is not required to be entered at the point of sale terminal by the cardholder. Also, anyone who has access to the card number, expiration date, cArdholder's name and billing address can initiate a transaction online or by phone.2

Again, excellent information- Thank You

Thank you!

I was contacted as early as last week with the computer scam . I only hope the FTC has stopped these parasites . There are many retired and seniors that have fallen prey . Good work FTC .


Thank you for that information about the chip scam for credit cards.

It sure would be nice for the many companies that have the chip reader for them to work, i.e., Walmart, Staples, Sams Club, Rite-Aid and many, many others. Why do these companies bother to even install these, supposedly secure, chip readers to begin with?

I work at Walmart. Sometimes those chip cards work good and sometimes not so good. As a cashier it's frustrating for customers when they take so long to process. A lot of times I just have the customer slide the card and it works then. Thanks for the FTC messages.

The use of computer should be tough at elementary school through the end of intermediate school.

Yeah it happened to me. And its omnipresent. Thank god the IP address was locatable. It was determined to be in I think Idaho. But it was a surf shop or something weird.

If you call the customer service number on the back of your card, you can request a card with a chip now. Otherwise it will be sent when your current card expires. If you do request a chip card, it should have the same card number but the expiration date and security number on the back will change. If you have any auto-renewals, you will have to contact them with the new renewal date. I learned the hard way that they expiration dates have to match or the card will be regected.

When you put a chip card in the chip reader the last 3 4 digit numbers hang and are visible to anyone to see or take camera shot on their ceel phone. The last 4 numbers are your account info. How safe is that?

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