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How can you spot a tech support scam?

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Are you getting pop-up warning messages on your computer screen? Or maybe a phone call that your computer has a virus? That may well be a tech support scam. But how do you know? And what do you do?

Start by watching this video on tech support scams.

How to Avoid a Tech Support Scam Video

Scammers love to sound legit by pretending to be from a real company – say Microsoft or Apple. They’ll make your computer “problem” sound urgent, trying to get you to act before you have time to think. And they’ll ask you for access to your computer, your bank or credit card number, or for money. But that’s not how real tech support works.

So, before you click the link in the pop up or call that number, stop. Talk to someone you trust. Read about tech supports scams. And remember:

  • Never share your bank account, credit card, or Social Security number with anyone who contacts you.
  • Somebody who tells you to pay with a gift card, money transfer, or Bitcoin is a scammer. Always.

Have you spotted a scam? Report it to the FTC at ftc.gov/complaint. To keep up to date with what the FTC is doing, sign up to get Consumer Alerts.

Scam Tags:  Tech Support Scams

Comments

Twice this morning I got a pop-up from someone pretending to be from Microsoft. The pop-up locked up my computer and prevented me from using my board or mouse. The telephone number of the scammer is 1-888-585-5298. Is there something that can be done to get this individual arrested?

You can report problems to the FTC at www.FTC.gov/Complaint. The information you give will go into a secure database that the FTC and other law enforcement agencies use for investigations.

The information you put here on the blog doesn't go into the law enforcment database.

And remember, Microsoft and Apple will NEVER call you to tell you that your computer has a virus. Any time you get a call claiming that they have been notified that your computer has a virus is a scammer.

Instead of asking someone you trust, why not obtain the actual company phone number via the company website, or perhaps in the program help box --not from the caller-- and call the company to ask?

This happened to me April 1st, 2020!
Thankfully I was able to stop the payment on my credit card before the crooks got to it.
very scary!!

This article didn't tell us how to get rid of that screen that freezes your computer. It happened to me once and the way I got rid of the "Blue screen of death" was to turn off my computer and then unplug my motim (spelling?) for a few seconds. Probably 10. When I turned my computer on a few minutes later, the scammers and the frozen screen were gone.

thank you,FTC. i have reported this scam, that happen to me.waiting to here, if these scammer will have to pay us all back?

wish I had read this before we got suckered by a thief called Maxwell. Scammed us for a lot of money and guess what..you get NO help. Its like sorry about your luck chuck.
We reported him to our bank the police the FBI and attorney General. No help

thanks

How can you talk about the Su Su or Sua Sua so called gifting game that's being pushed among Afro-Americans? And talk about whether its a scam?

We published a blog in August about scammers imitating a type of informal savings club known as a “sou sou” or “susu” to trick people into joining what amounts to an illegal pyramid scheme.

A real “sou sou” is a rotating savings club with historic roots in West Africa and the Caribbean. But scammers are pitching fake sou sou savings clubs and opportunities like “The Circle Game,” “Blessing Loom,” “Money Board”.

I constantly have pop ups on my computer stating Microsoft need to "fix a problem", most like due to a password change. I have not changed my password. Can this be correct?

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