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Spotting scammy emails

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Let’s say you get an email about a charge to your credit card for something you aren’t expecting or don’t want. Your first instinct may be to immediately call the company or respond to the email and to stop the payment. Scammers know that, and are taking advantage of it in a new phishing scheme.

People tell us they’re getting emails that look like they’re from Norton, a company that sells antivirus and anti-malware software. (Tip: the emails are NOT from Norton.) The emails say you’ve been (or are about to be) charged for a Norton product — maybe an auto renewal or new order. If this is a mistake, the email says, you should call immediately. (Tip: don’t.)

 Scam Email, Not Really from Norton. Learn more: ftc.gov/imposter. Report tech support scams at: ReportFraud.ftc.gov. Image of an email. From: [redacted]. Date: Tue, Feb 9, 2021. Subject: BILLING DEPARTMENT. To: [redacted]. Body of email: "You have been charged $299.99 for your Norton auto renewal. If there has been a mistake, please call 1-999-999-9999 within one business day when you are in front of your computer. Thanks & Regards, Norton (TM) Billing Team." Image of Norton logo with yellow circle and black checkmark.

If you call, you’ll be connected to a scammer. Some scammers might ask you to “verify” your credit card information, while others might say they need your password to remote into your computer so they can remove the Norton program. But if you let them, they could install malware, block you from getting to your own files, and sell you worthless services.

If you get an email or text you’re not sure about:

  • Don’t click on any links.
  • Don’t use the number in the email or text. If you want to call the company that supposedly sent the message, look up their phone number online.

Remember:

  • Never give your password to a stranger on the phone, even if they claim to be from a company you recognize.
  • If you did give out your password, change it right away, update your computer’s security software, run a scan, and delete anything it identifies as a problem.
  • Make your passwords long, strong, and complex.
  • Don’t give your bank account, credit card, or personal information over the phone to someone who contacts you out of the blue.

And if you do get a fake email like this, help your community by reporting it to the FTC at ReportFraud.ftc.gov.

Scam Tags:  Phishing Scams

Comments

Thank you for a great service to the public

I get several emails a day from the fake Norton email address. Thankfully they all end up in my SPAM folder.

I've been getting a lot of calls with an automated voice telling me that $529 has been charged to my credit card and to call a # if this was not me so watch out

Thank you for being the voice of reason. Our society needs this.

It seemed to me you were describing what happened to me on Feb.8th: I checked my checking account, and there was a charge I did not make, sent to me from the Geek Squad. They apologized, told me that immediately they would returned the money to me, to check my account again. There was a deposit, but for 3,000 plus the amount I disputed. I said I needed to return that money; was told me how to, and then again they deposited some money "by mistake".

I get these e-mails and phone calls frequently. I report it as a phishing e-mail through my e-mail provider. If it involves money or my account, I call the company's phone number to ensure my account has not been tampered with. I have had no problems yet. I recently received a call from someone (foreign accent) from the Publisher's Clearing House (PCH). They eventually got down to the scam by asking me if I had a nearby drug store and they would provide a code. I knew this was a scam because PCH wouldn't ask about a drug store nor provide a code. I then called PCH to let them know about the scam and gave them what information I had. Be careful, concerning e-mails too. I received several scams claiming to be from an on-line company. I reported the scam to my e-mail provider as phishing and then called the company to ensure my account was not tampered with. Use extreme caution. Ask yourself if this is the way the company would conduct its business.

This is very good information.

I pass along to any smartbl mobile phone user, never answer any phone recorded call or phone call that is not on your smart mobile phones Main Contact List also for texts that you receive that are not on your Main Contact List ever!! As that is a scammer! Who is a brainless theiving criminal! That will never ever know what a professional American employee is!!! And never ever will! And thank God for our FTC that sues these fake company's that our theiving criminals!!!! Forever! And needs to be put behind prison bars 4ever!!!!

Thank you! Stuff we all know, but it's easy to react to a threat to your credit card. Recently I was told someone had purchased Smart TV on my Amazon card. Wanted to react, but just ignored and it went away.

The email you advised me to use (ReportFraud.ftc.gov) to report fraud is not valid and when I use it I get a message that it is not a valid address!!!

www.ReportFraud.ftc.gov is not an email.

It is a FTC website where you can report scams, frauds and bad business practices. Click on ReportFraud.ftc.gov to go to the site, or type www.ReportFraud.ftc.gov into the search bar on your computer to go to the website.

Had this happen not only with Norton but with Amazon. I sent all emails like this to SPAM!

I usually spotted the potential emails, however it is very difficult to verify whether the phone numbers listed are legitimate. I often find the phone numbers are often run by the third party, marketing groups and/or suspicious loan and investment companies. - Just my personal experience.

Hope you can help me too and stop their illegal works and be fair to others..

My wife is getting Emails about a computer she did not order. The msg says that she is going to get a $1,000.00 charge on her credit card. HA, What a joke. I wish we had a $1,000.00. But now we are getting Voice Mails along the same Idea. Thanks for the warning.

I'm here to make sure I'm right, I got one this morning supposedly from Microsoft. I was already pretty sure that's what it was but now I know. I stuck the email in a folder just in case anyone wants to see it

I received the Norton scam as three different emails with three different amounts for auto-renewal which was from gmail accounts and not from LifeLock or Norton. I called the number, immediately was suspicious. Told them that no, they do not need to refund me that I would go into my account and access the support number from there and see what was what. I hung up on them and reported the scam. I saw on this site this is an ongoing on, and though I did not take the bait, I did file a complaint to help them narrow in on the scammer.

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