Identity Theft

Free credit freezes from Equifax

Many people have had very sensitive personal information exposed in the Equifax breach — Social Security numbers, account numbers, even drivers’ license numbers. Equifax is offering free credit freezes until November 21, 2017. The company also will refund fees to anyone who already paid for freezes since September 7, when it announced the breach. If you’re thinking of placing a freeze, read this first.

The Equifax Data Breach: What to Do

If you have a credit report, there’s a good chance that you’re one of the 143 million American consumers whose sensitive personal information was exposed in a data breach at Equifax, one of the nation’s three major credit reporting agencies.

No secret bank accounts to pay your bills

Another day, another scam. Case in point: the Federal Reserve Bank of New York reports that scammers are telling people they can pay their bills using so-called “secret accounts” or “Social Security trust accounts” and routing numbers at Federal Reserve Banks.

FTC proud of service to America

Every year, the Partnership for Public Service awards Samuel J. Heyman Service to America Medals (the “Sammies” – or kind of the Oscars for feds) to highlight excellence in the federal workforce, and programs that make the country better, safer and stronger. This year, the FTC is proud to be a finalist in the Homeland Security and Law Enforcement Category, for our team’s work in creating IdentityTheft.gov. (Please vote for the People’s Choice.) But we’re just as proud that the FTC’s work is represented in three of the four finalists in that category.

Keep security in mind on your summer vacation

When you travel, there probably are a few must-haves in your suitcase: your toothbrush, deodorant, socks, shoes – you get the idea. But one travel must-have we don’t always think about is security. While you’re away from home, you might be using public Wi-Fi, tagging your locations (whether or not you realize it), carrying around your passport, and using your credit card more often. Those things could put you at a higher risk of identity theft.
 

 

Military Consumer Financial Workshop is July 19th

I’m the proud daughter of a Navy veteran, and attended school on two military bases from elementary through high school. Looking back – although I may not have fully understood the consequences at the time – I see how various financial issues and scams affected the lives of my military friends and their families. That’s why I take consumer protection for servicemembers, veterans and their families seriously. For me, it’s personal. It’s also a top priority for the FTC.

Check up on your credit every year

Did you ever apply for credit and were refused? There may be something on your credit report that’s holding you back. But it might not all be accurate. Checking your credit report at least once a year helps you know what’s there – and keeps you on track for a healthier financial future.

Blog Topics: 
Money & Credit

Protect your mortgage closing from scammers

It’s National Homeownership Month, and the FTC and the National Association of Realtors® want to remind you that scammers sometimes use emails to rob home buyers of their closing costs and personal information.

Blog Topics: 
Homes & Mortgages

Avoid skimmers at the pump

Skimmers are illegal card readers attached to payment terminals — like gas pumps — that grab data off a credit or debit card’s magnetic stripe without your knowledge. Criminals sell the stolen data or use it to buy things online. You won’t know your information has been stolen until you get your statement or an overdraft notice. Here are tips to help you avoid a skimmer when you gas up.

Blog Topics: 
Money & Credit

An identity thief stole my phone!

Identity theft can happen to anyone. I’m a fraud investigator, and I’d like to tell you about my identity theft. Knowing how to respond will help you if you ever have to recover your identity.

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