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Protecting Kids Online

What to do when you (and your kids) are online at home

If you have kids in school, there’s a good chance they’re kicking off their school year…in your living room. All the while, you might be working away, yourself, in some carved out corner at home.

Are the apps your children use illegally marketing to them?

Kids love to play video games — in apps, on mobile devices and online with friends. And when kids play games, it is unlawful to collect their personal information without parental consent. 

Remote learning and children’s privacy

“Social distancing,” “shelter-in-place,” “virtual happy hour” – these are some of the new expressions on everyone’s lips the past few weeks. For many kids, parents, and teachers, add “remote learning” or “distance learning” to the list. Because of Coronavirus-related school closures, millions of students are now learning from home. For parents who are concerned about the privacy and security of their children’s personal data while they’re learning online, here are some things to know.

YouTube pays big for tracking kids

Does your child love YouTube videos? Did you know that while little Susie was watching her favorite shows, YouTube was collecting data and using it to send her targeted ads? Under a settlement with the FTC, YouTube and its parent company, Google, must pay a record $170 million for violating the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA) Rule.

Parental Advisory: Dating Apps

Parents be warned: some dating apps – like FastMeet, Meet24 and Meet4U – allow adults to find and communicate with children. Concerned parents should remove these apps if they’re on children’s devices. You also can set your kids’ devices so they must get parental approval before purchasing any new apps. Here are a few more things you should know.

Musical.ly took kids’ info without parents’ ok

Do you know a child who dreams of being the next big star? Who spends time at home, recording song and dance routines (maybe over, and over, and over again)? That child may have used a free app called Musical.ly, now known as TikTok, to create and share recordings. And you’ll want to read about the FTC’s recent settlement with Musical.ly .

Hispanic Heritage Month: Protecting Your Family Online

According to the Pew Internet & American Life Project, almost 9 out of 10 Latino teens have access to the internet. And with tablets and smartphones, they could be online away from your home and your watchful eyes—even the ones in the back of your head.

As a parent, there’s a lot you can do to protect your kids online. And you don’t have to be tech savvy to do it. Research shows that the best way to protect your kids online is to talk to them. So where can you start? This video helps you talk to your kids about being safe online.