scam

Business License Scams: A Barrier for Reentrants

Many reentrants don’t believe they will ever get a business license through the usual channels. That makes them vulnerable to scams. Some reentrants may find themselves frustrated by occupational licensing regulations that don’t make sense. Maybe their trade is licensed in some states, but not others. That’s confusing.

If you’re looking to get a professional or business license, here are three things you should do before you pay anyone money:

Blog Topics: 
Jobs & Making Money

Give wisely to help shooting victims

Tugging at your heartstrings is a tried and true method scammers use to get to your wallet. When tragedy strikes, they take advantage.

Sadly, the Las Vegas shooting is no exception. The FTC has heard from people about suspicious requests for donations. A little research will help you avoid a scam and ensure that your gift goes to a reputable charity that will use the money as you intend.

Blog Topics: 
Money & Credit

Equifax isn’t calling

Ring, ring. "This is Equifax calling to verify your account information." Stop. Don’t tell them anything. They’re not from Equifax. It’s a scam. Equifax will not call you out of the blue.

Avoid hurricane clean-up scams

After natural disasters like Hurricanes Irma and Harvey, unlicensed contractors and scammers often come into the affected area promising immediate clean-up and debris removal. Some demand payment up-front for work they never do. Others simply lack the skills, licenses, and insurance to legally do the work.

Here are some tips to protect yourself, your property, and your money.

Blog Topics: 
Homes & Mortgages

Help stop fraud this Hispanic Heritage Month

If you follow this blog, you probably have seen our fotonovelas. These are short graphic novels in Spanish that tell stories about scams prevalent in Latino communities. The fotonovelas are based on real stories from people who reported fraud to us. Who exactly are they? People just like you and me who reported a scam, and who want to share their stories to help others. Check out this video to meet some of them, and learn how you can take action to help stop fraud and scams.

Blog Topics: 
Money & Credit

Hurricane Harvey scams: Callers lie about flood insurance

One thing we’ve learned at the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) is that scams often follow the news – especially when there’s a natural disaster, like Hurricane Harvey, in the headlines. Case in point: Colleagues at the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) tell us homeowners and renters are getting robocalls telling them their flood premiums are past due.

Blog Topics: 
Homes & Mortgages

Phantom debt collectors impersonate law firms

Getting a call from a debt collector can be stressful. But it can be downright frightening when the caller uses lies, profanity and threats to try to get you to pay. In a case announced today, the FTC says a debt collection operation in Charlotte, NC pretended to be lawyers. Really, they were not lawyers and had no authority to collect debts.

Blog Topics: 
Money & Credit

Wise giving in the wake of Hurricane Harvey

It’s heartbreaking to see people lose their lives, homes, and businesses to the ongoing flooding in Texas. But it’s despicable when scammers exploit such tragedies to appeal to your sense of generosity.

Blog Topics: 
Money & Credit

False promises from a work-at-home scam

It’s hard to pass up a job opportunity that promises a large income and the flexibility of working entirely from home. Especially when the opportunity appears at the top of your online search results and includes video testimonials of success stories, making it seem legitimate. The problem is, most of these job opportunities are scams and won’t deliver on their promises.

Blog Topics: 
Jobs & Making Money

No secret bank accounts to pay your bills

Another day, another scam. Case in point: the Federal Reserve Bank of New York reports that scammers are telling people they can pay their bills using so-called “secret accounts” or “Social Security trust accounts” and routing numbers at Federal Reserve Banks.

Pages