You are here

Tag: health

Dressing up for Halloween can be fun. Revelers often use make-up, wigs and cosmetic contact lenses to complete their look.

Cosmetic contacts lenses – also known as costume or decorative contact lenses – can change the way your eye looks...

You may have heard of using aloe vera for sunburn relief. A Florida company claimed its aloe products would relieve joint and muscle pain, diabetes, acid reflux and more — and that health studies confirmed its claims. Not so, says the FTC. Under...

You see the ads on TV, hear them on the radio, or read them in print and online: attorneys telling you about the dangers of certain prescription drugs. Many of these ads open with “medical alert,” “health alert” or “consumer alert” to get your...

Three companies that tout their cannabis-derived products as miracle treatments for serious illnesses have gotten letters from the FTC warning that they’re at risk for legal action unless they have sound scientific evidence...

Some ads for weight loss products promise miracles. They might say that the product works for everyone or will let you lose weight permanently. Those claims are lies. Dishonest advertisers will tell you anything to get you to buy their product....

Wouldn’t it be nice if you could lose weight simply by taking a pill, wearing a patch, or rubbing in a cream? Unfortunately, claims that you can lose weight without changing your habits just aren’t true, and some of these products could even hurt...

Here’s one that goes to show just how creative scammers can be. The FTC is getting reports that callers claiming to be from Medicare are asking people for their Medicare numbers, Social Security numbers, and other personal information…in exchange...

If you’re like some of us here at the Consumer Blog, even though you make a list of things to pack when you go on vacation, you may accidentally leave something behind. Sure, you can buy shampoo, flip flops, and sunscreen almost anywhere. But if...

“Burn fat. Reduce cravings. Feel better. Lose weight.” Some dietary supplements come with big promises backed by five-star customer reviews. But do these supplements really do what they say? And can you trust those five-star ratings?

...

Ads abound for products that claim to treat or prevent serious health conditions. Unfortunately, these products often are unproven and useless. Sometimes the ads even make false promises for Alzheimer’s disease and dementia – conditions for which...

Pages