Consumer Information Blog

Sham charity operators turn the Big C into a Big Con

If you know someone with cancer, you may have considered donating to a cancer-related charity. Many legitimate charities use donations to find treatments and cures. Some support patients and families. But there also are bogus charities that lie, exploit your generosity, and use donations to help their managers, their friends, and their families, not the causes described to donors.4 Sham cancer charities: $187 million in donations

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Money & Credit

Wipes in pipes cause clogs and gripes

For most people, plumbing problems rank right up there with root canals on the list of “experiences to avoid.” We’re careful about what we flush. We may rely on ads or product labels for information about what’s safe to put in the system, so it’s important those are accurate. According to the FTC, Nice-Pak Products lacked proof to support its claims that its wipes were safe for sewer and septic systems. Under a proposed settlement, the company can’t say the wipes are safe to flush unless it has new tests proving they are.

Blog Topics: 
Money & Credit

Recovering from identity theft is easier with a plan

Hollywood might have you believe that identity theft means a dozen maxed out credit cards, a warrant for your arrest, and a bill for a spa appointment 2,000 miles away. But in real life, identity theft can be sneakier.

It might start with a small credit card charge you don’t recognize. Or a strange new account that shows up on your credit report. Or a letter from the IRS that says you already filed taxes this year. Only you didn’t.

Wash that hype right outta your hair

Most of us know better than to seek the Fountain of Youth, take a sip from it, and expect to reverse the signs of aging. That’s called a myth.

When ads claim a product will permanently remove or prevent the growth of gray hair, but the claim isn’t backed by science, the FTC calls that deception – and we hold companies accountable for it.

Blog Topics: 
Health & Fitness

Attention Women Over 40: Claims may slim your wallet, not your waist

Weight gain and stubborn belly fat: the bane of many middle-aged women. But what if there were a clinically-proven supplement that could help you lose substantial weight, reduce that pouch, and increase your metabolism? Well, one company claimed that’s just what they were offering. Only one problem, says the FTC: the company doesn’t have the evidence to support its claims.

Blog Topics: 
Health & Fitness

Get into the act and pass it on

 Get into the act — that’s the theme for Older Americans Month this May. Wondering how you can get into the act in your community? Try using Pass it On — the FTC’s consumer education materials designed to start older adults talking about scams. 

Blog Topics: 
Money & Credit

International collaboration to protect children’s privacy

The Federal Trade Commission and 27 members of the Global Privacy Enforcement Network (GPEN), a group of privacy enforcement agencies around the world, are marshaling resources to protect the privacy of children online.

A friendly reminder

Just a friendly reminder...if you haven’t changed your passwords in a while, today is a great day to do it. Why? Because it’s Password Day!

A Navajo Nation roundtable

At the FTC we want to serve every community, and we work to educate and protect consumers everywhere. For that reason, we were delighted to be invited by the Navajo Nation Human Rights Commission to talk consumer issues with members of one of our nation’s oldest communities: the Navajo Nation.

Blog Topics: 
Money & Credit

Spammy, phony weight loss promises

You get an email from a friend, with a link and a message: “Hi! Oprah says it’s excellent!” But did your friend really send this message? And what’s so excellent?

Millions of people got emails like this one, but not from their friends. Instead, according to the FTC, marketers hired by Sale Slash sent spam emails from hacked email and social media accounts. Why? To trick people into thinking the messages came from a friend. And, of course, to sell stuff.

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