Consumer Information Blog

A ‘versatile’ way to get around the Do Not Call list

Some companies can be very sneaky these days. Especially when they buy lists of consumers’ phone numbers from companies that falsely claim those consumers have given written consent to get sales calls despite being on the National Do Not Call registry.

Blog Topics: 
Privacy & Identity

Let’s celebrate Women’s History Month

March is Women’s History Month. At the FTC, we celebrate and honor the many female leaders whose work has significantly impacted the agency’s mission.

What’s a predictive score?

Most consumers know that creditors use information about them and their credit experiences – like the number and type of accounts they have, their bill paying history, and whether they pay their bills on time – to create a credit score, which helps predict how credit worthy they are. (And if they don’t, they can learn about credit scores at the FTC’s Consumer Center.) What most consumers don’t know is that data brokers offer companies scores for other purposes unrelated to credit – for example, for marketing, advertising, identity verification, and fraud prevention. Businesses use these scores to decide which transactions require further scrutiny, what offers and prices to offer certain consumers, and even in what order to answer a consumer’s customer service call.

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Check, please? Background check, that is.

So, you’re about to begin a new job search, and you’re ticking items off your to-do list.

  • You’ve set up an online account so you’ll know about new job openings.
  • You’ve polished your resume — and your shoes.
  • You’ve run through some possible interview questions with a friend.

Have you requested your annual credit report from www.annualcreditreport.com?

two people shaking hands over a desk

Blog Topics: 
Jobs & Making Money

From Las Vegas to the world

Earlier this week, law enforcement, legal services attorneys, consumer advocates and nearly 120 other people found common ground in Las Vegas. The Federal Trade Commission put together “Protecting Nevada’s Consumers: A Common Ground Conference” to discuss the consumer protection issues facing Nevadans. What did we learn? That Nevadans face some unique challenges – but many more are the same kinds of challenges we see across the region and country.

Can you believe that review?

Ever hear an expert review on a news segment or talk show? The experts might recommend a number of products, and hey, they’ve tried out the products themselves — and they’re experts appearing on reputable programs — so they must know what they’re talking about, right? Since they’re portrayed as independent reviewers, you may be more likely to believe what they say.

What if we told you these experts aren’t always as impartial as they seem, and what you’re hearing might be a sales pitch?

Photo of woman watching TV

Blog Topics: 
Money & Credit

Data breaches: What’s a person to do?

Recent headlines about data breaches at retail stores and universities may have you wondering if there’s anything you can do to help protect your credit going forward. The Federal Trade Commission (FTC), the nation’s consumer protection agency, says the answer is yes. One option is a credit freeze.

Blog Topics: 
Money & Credit

Message sent, message received: Precious metal marketers agree to FTC settlement

As part of the Federal Trade Commission's ongoing efforts to stop scammers who target older people, the operator of a bogus precious metals telemarketing scheme that bilked millions of dollars from them is permanently banned from selling any investment opportunity under a settlement with the agency.

Blog Topics: 
Jobs & Making Money

Welcome to NCPW 2014

Sunday marks the 16th annual National Consumer Protection Week. The Federal Trade Commission stands with 74 federal, state and local agencies and organizations to stand up for consumers by highlighting the very best in consumer education resources.

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Random text? Wait, wait, don’t click that!

Here’s a tip that’s worth repeating:
Don’t click on a link in a text message you get on your phone that says you’ve won a terrific prize or a gift card. Don’t reply either. It’s probably a scam.
The Federal Trade Commission settled charges with a group of marketers that were part of a scheme that sent millions of unsolicited spam text messages promoting supposedly free merchandise like $1,000 gift cards for Wal-Mart and Best Buy.

Blog Topics: 
Privacy & Identity

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